Three tools for quickly creating year-end slideshow videos

As I mentioned in my weekly newsletter, a sure sign that the end of the school year is approaching always increases the number of questions I receive about saving and moving files in my inbox. Another sign that the end of the school year is approaching is the increase in questions that have just arrived in my inbox, I have taken many pictures this year. I want to put them in a slideshow with music for my students for the last day of school. Do you recommend the program? Thanks.

If you’re also thinking of creating year-end slideshow videos for your students, here are a few tools I recommend.

Adobe Creative Cloud Express Video
Adobe Creative Cloud Express was formerly known as Adobe Spark. I’ve been using it since it was launched half a dozen years ago. Adobe Creative Cloud Express makes it easy for students to create short audio slideshow videos. It has a library of background music that you can insert into your videos. Finally, Adobe Creative Cloud Express is a collaborative tool so you can invite a colleague to work with you on creating year-end slideshow videos. Watch this video to learn how to create videos with Adobe Creative Cloud Express.

Canvas
Canvas Audio slideshow offers two ways to create video. The first way is to put together a series of slides and then select a soundtrack to play in the background. That process is displayed here. Another way is to use the Canvar full video editor to add a custom timing to the description in an audio slideshow video. That process is shown in this video.

Microsoft Photos
Microsoft Photos has a video creation tool for creating small audio slideshow-style videos. You can find it only by opening the Native Photos app in Windows 10. Editor includes tools to add animated effects to still images, insert your existing video clips into a video project, and add audio to your video. Creative Commons has a great option for searching licensed images and inserting them directly into your video project. The best part of that feature is that the attribution information is automatically added to the images you choose through the built-in search tool. In the following video I provide a demonstration of how to create a video on Microsoft Photos in Windows 10.


The best playlist song of the year

Here we extend the end of the school year, and it’s time to celebrate! So whether you’re looking for the perfect graduation song or just a tune that will capture the exact moment of the end of the year, we’ve got you covered with this year’s end playlist. (Caution: Tears may be involved).

1. No new friends by LSD

2. Something big about Shawn Mendes

Some of Shawn Mendes' big ones: "It's like feeling like you're going to win a medal / and you worked so hard that you knew you wouldn't settle down / hands in the air, hands in the air," Year-end playlist song

3. Count on Mr. Bruno Mars

4. Let’s Get Loud by Jennifer Lopez

5. History in one direction

6. Hey look mom, I made it to the disco in panic

7. Who says Selena Gomez

8. Hall of Fame by The Script

9. Compass by Lady Antibelam

10. Eternal Sunshine by Zin Iko

11. Sing by Pentatonix

12. Young Forever J-Z, by fame. Mr. Hudson

13. Try everything by Shakira

14. The future by paramour

Future by paramour: "So just think of your future / think of new life / don't get lost in memory / keep an eye on new rewards," Year-end playlist song

15. Good Old Day by McCallmore, achievement. Hair

16. I am feeling by Black Eyed Piece

17. I live by One Republic

18. Rivers and roads by head and heart

19. Home by Philip Phillips

20. They are counted by OneRepublic

By one republic they count: "Lately, lately I've been losing sleep / Dreaming about the things that can happen to us / Baby, baby I'm praying hard / I said don't count dollars anymore, we will count them, yes we will count them

21. Live It Well by Switchfoot

22. Have It All Jason Mraj

23. My wish by Rascal Flats

24. I hope you dance by LeeAnn Womack

25. On My Way by Phil Collins

26. Unwritten by Natasha Beddingfield

27. It’s Our Time by Marty Casey

28. We are fun to be young. And General Mona

We are fun young.  And General Mona: "Tonight / We are young / So let's burn the earth / We are brighter than the sun / Tonight / We are young / So let's burn the earth / We can be brighter than the sun / We can burn," Year-end playlist song

29. Miley Cyrus Climb

30. Time of your life by Green Day

31. The best day of my life by American writers

32. I will remember you by Sarah McLachlan

33. Never say goodbye to Bon Jovi

34. This world is yours, written by Julie Darden

35. See what you’ve done with Drake

See what you did with Drake:"You knew I was going to be something / When you're tense and you need something, I got you / See what you did, what you did"

36. Graham Colton’s Best Days

37. Good Life by OneRepublic

38. Back home by Andy Grammar

39. Sing my chemical romance

40. Breakaway by Kelly Clarkson

41. Graduation by Vitamin C (Friends Forever)

42. Longevity by Taylor Swift

43. Top of the world by fantasy dragon

44. Will be seen again by Wiz Khalifa and Charlie Puth

Will be seen again by Wiz Khalifa, Kirti.  Charlie Puth: "First you both get out of your way / and the vibration feels strong and what / will turn into a small friendship, a friendship / will become a bond and that bond will never break / will be broken and love will never be lost"

45. Glad you came by The Wanted

46. ​​Happy by Farrell

47. By The Rembrandts I’ll be there for you

48. The season of love by the rental cast

49. Live Like We Are Dying by Chris Allen

50. Born this way by Lady Gaga

Do you have a favorite song in your year-end playlist? Share to our WeAreTeachers HELPLINE group on Facebook.

Also, check out the 9 signs of the end of the school year.

Resource Round-up: Secondary Distance Learning (Number 4)

This resource round-up includes resources that will support your students’ critical analysis and creative thinking in your distance learning classroom as well as distance learning contexts. We are featuring interactive resources, digital activity and more. Check out these resources – half of which are free!


Physical Education Student Form - Activity Tracking Log
Physical Education Student Form – Activity Tracking Log by Avery’s Wheelhouse

It’s free!

“This Student Physical Activity Log gives you the opportunity to know your students’ activity goals / reflections and activity levels in a simple step. Students are able to set goals, log physical activity, and reflect progress on a single page. This tool is ready to print and use with your students. “

PE Alternative Assessment / Project Huge Printable Bundle
PE Alternative Assessment / Project Huge Printable Bundle by Everyone’s Wheelhouse

“This money-saving bundle for Google Slides 6 contains thirteen complete project prompts for alternative assessment in physical education classes when students cannot participate.”

Editable cat puzzle pixel art (16 regular question space)
Cat puzzle pixel art editable by Hello Algebra (16 regular question space)

It’s free!

“This self-test and exciting digital activity lets you choose your own questions and answers to meet your current learning topics. Students will answer correctly and the image will reveal a colorful cat!”

10 Questions Progress Monitoring Task Card Puzzle Pixel Template
Hello 10 Questions Progress Monitoring Task Card Puzzle Pixel Template by Algebra

“One of the best features of Digital Resource is the ability to self-test and auto-grade! In this task card puzzle pixel art template, students will choose one question at a time for viewing, then type their answer in the space provided. If the answers are entered correctly, their grade The progress of the calculation will change accordingly with the monitoring bar.

FACS Culinary Arts Daily Journal Free sample for Google and print
FACS Kitchen Arts Daily Journal Free Sample for Google and Print by Twins and Teaching

It’s free!

“The Bell Ringer Journal of this culinary art includes the first 10 entries for students to complete. It’s available in both Google and print editions, and it’s a great way to start each class day with a question about food and cooking! ”

FACS & Culinary Bell Ringer Journal Bundle: Digital & Print
FACS and Culinary Bell Ringer Journal Bundle: Digital and Printing by Twins and Teaching

“This culinary arts bell ringer journal is a great way to start every cooking art class. It helps your students think about cooking, food and cooking in both Google and print formats! ”

Order of Operation Crossword Puzzle I
Order of Operations Crossword Puzzle I Maya Khalil

It’s free!

“A crossword puzzle that gives students practice following the correct sequence of activities, then allows them to test their work by placing their answers in the puzzle.”

Exponents Practice Worksheet I
“Laws of Exponents Practice Worksheet I” by Maya Khalil

“A comprehensive law of comprehensive practice. Each section begins with a clear example to guide students through the law enforcement process. “

Free technology for teachers: SplashLearn

When an email about SplashLearn Splash arrived in my inbox last week, I didn’t think much of it because I get dozens of pitches every morning and at first glance I thought it was another rotation practice app. Turns out I was wrong about this is just a rotation practice app.

At its core, SplashLearn is a service that provides a free and ad-free environment where students can practice their math and ELA skills. Students can use it in the web browser on their computer or use the free SplashLearn mobile app.

The only way students can access splashler games and other activities is through your free classroom account. As a teacher you sign up for SplashLearn then create an account for them. Creating an account for your students is quick and easy. You can manually enter names (or initials only), import a spreadsheet of names, or import a Google Classroom Roster. Students are given little avatars to represent themselves. Students then go to the link you provided, access the splashlorn, and then tap on their avatars and follow the image that presents the class password. (See my screenshot below for details). Alternatively, students can open SplashLearn then select “Student” and write the class code.

You may have guessed by now, because as your students access SplashLearn through the classroom account you created, you’ll see their progress on your teacher’s dashboard. It is in your Teacher Dashboard that you can find standardized math and ELA activities to assign to your students. To find activities to assign to your students you simply select Math or ELA then select the grade level after the standard for which you want to find activities. Activities can be assigned to the whole class or to individual students in your class.

Application for education

The value of SplashLearn is available on the Teacher Dashboard. Specifically, the way you can find activities and assign them to your students as needed where SplashLearn becomes valuable. With that dashboard you can quickly find activities to help your students practice and strengthen their skills and monitor their progress.

What is vision? Get Definition Plus Teaching Resources

When you become a new teacher, that’s the number buzzwords It seems overwhelming at times that you have to master. You’ve probably heard of many ideas, but you may not be entirely sure what they are or how to use them in your classroom. For example, the new teacher Katie B. Asks, “That sounds like a really basic question, but what are vision words and where do I get them?” No worries, Katie. We’ve got you covered!

What is the difference between visual sound and high-frequency sound?

Often we use terms The closest word And Sound of high frequency Interchangeably Opinions differ, but our research shows that there is a difference. High-frequency words are words that are commonly found in written language. Although some standard phonetic patterns match, some do not. Vision words are a subset of high-frequency words that do not fit standard phonetic patterns and are therefore not easily decoded.

We consistently use both types of words in spoken and written language and they also appear in textbooks and books including stories. Once students learn to recognize these words quickly, reading becomes easier.

What are vision words and how can I teach my students to memorize them?

Sound sounds like sight Come on, ByOr WHO Don’t follow that Spelling rules Or Six types of syllables. Decoding these words can be very difficult for young students. General habits have been taught to the students Memorize These words as a whole, by sight, so that they can recognize them immediately (within three seconds) and read them without using decoding skills.

Can I teach reading words using the science of reading?

On the other hand, recent research based on the science of reading suggests that we may use techniques beyond memory. According to the science of reading, it is possible to extract many visual sounds because they have recognized patterns. Literacy expert Susan Jones, a proponent of using reading science to teach sight words, recommends a method called phoneme-grapheme mapping where students first map the words they hear in a word and then add graphemes (letters) to each word. .

And how can I teach vision words?

There are many fun and exciting ways to teach vision words. Dozens of books have been published on the subject, many of which are highly regarded Extensive phonetics, spelling, and word study guide By fountains and pineal. Also, resources like games, manipulatives and flash cards are readily available online and in stores. To help you get started, check out these Creative and simple vision word activities for the classroom. Also, see Susan Jones Teaching for three science-of-reading concepts and much more.

Where can I find a list of visual words?

The two most popular sources are Dolch High Frequency Words List and Fry High Frequency Words List.

In the 1930s and 1940s, Dr. Edward Dolch compiled his vocabulary, which was used from pre-K to third grade, to study the most frequently occurring words in children’s books of that era. The list contains 200 “service words” and 95 high-frequency nouns Dolch word list Consists of 80 percent About 50 percent of the words you will find in a typical children’s book and the words found in writing for adults.

Dr. Edward Fry created an expanded vocabulary for grades 1-10 in the 1950s (updated 1980), based on the most common words appearing in reading materials used in grades 3-9. The fry list contains the most common 1,000 words in English. About 90 percent of the words found in a typical book, newspaper, or website include fry words.

Looking for more visual sound activities? Check out 20 fun phoenix activities and games for beginner readers.

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How to teach Asian-Pacific American Heritage in school

Nearly 23 million people across the United States have an Asian or Pacific island heritage, which means that many of your students are probably connected to different histories and cultures of the Asian-Pacific American community. To make sure your lessons reflect the diversity of the students you serve, it’s important to reflect on how you can bring Asian-Pacific American history, heritage, and contributions into your classroom throughout the year (both May), which is Asia-Pacific American Heritage Month, and Even after that). Here are some recommendations from educators in the Asian and Pacific Islands that you can use as a starting point for this work.

5 Ways to Teach Asian-Pacific American History, Culture, and Experience

Use these techniques to teach about the breadth and depth of Asian-Pacific American history, culture, and experience – in May and throughout the school year.

Do your research.

While the experiences and perspectives of Asian and Pacific islanders prioritize teaching in their classrooms, Donat Lovin’s teacher, Stacey, a 5th-8th grader, recommends them as the first step in their own research and learning. “Just like teachers bring to the classroom, you first have to create your own context and understanding,” he says. “You can start by thinking about what you’ve already learned and look for ways to incorporate representations of the Asian and Pacific islands, or you can dive in to learn more about a specific topic.”

Extend the voices and experiences of Asian and Pacific islanders in your curriculum.

The Asian and Pacific island communities – both in the United States and around the world – are incredibly diverse groups of people, each with their own unique culture and history. For this reason, it is important for educators to look at and include the voices of Asian and Pacific islanders to ensure a broad and accurate representation of these communities. Stephanie, a middle school math teacher from Math with Mrs. Yee, emphasizes the importance of finding, listening, and expanding the voices of people from Asian and Pacific islands in your curriculum. “If you are looking for an Asian or Pacific island history, person or cultural resource,” he says, “try to find [materials by] Authors whose experience may be reflected in the resources you use. “

Book leverage as a starting point.

Books written by and about Asian and Pacific islanders are a good starting point for gaining new insights and perspectives. For young readers in particular, books can be a great way to introduce topics like diversity and acceptance into the curriculum. Good day in first class, first class teacher ha Said “I have found that using picture books and explaining the importance of celebrating diversity has been most effective in helping my students become more engaged. In addition to learning about well-known and prominent Asian-Pacific Americans, it has further expanded my students’ understanding and appreciation of the contributions of these individuals throughout our history. ”

In addition, books not only serve as a great way to bring diversity to your classroom, but also allow students in Asian and Pacific islands to see themselves in the materials they are learning. Jane, a first-grade teacher from Keep Your Chin, talks about why this is so important. “Lack of variety in children’s books can be detrimental to the self-image of students whose stories are unspoken and under-presented. If our students don’t see themselves consistently or see a connection between the books they read and the subjects they learn in school, “he says,” it sends a message that learning about their culture isn’t important enough. “

Connect with content that they are already learning

Many of the teachers-writers we interviewed emphasized the need to build connections and highlight the history, culture and people of the Asian and Pacific islands in their daily lessons. Doing so can help students spread cultural awareness as well as help them gain a more global understanding of the world we live in. From Kip Your Chin Up, Jane had a lot of ideas in other ways that teachers can do In English, read biographies of influential Asian Pacific Americans or books written by authors from Asian or Pacific islands. In social studies, learn about the geography of Asian countries. Can study. ”

Similarly, a teacher from high and low to 4th grade will make a connection between Haimi American history and the history of his native Korea. “While learning about the American Civil War, I highlight the Korean Civil War and discuss some of our similarities and differences.” He says. “And while learning about famous American leaders, I mention some notable Korean leaders, such as King Sejong who created the Hangul (Korean alphabet) for his people.” He noted that sometimes when he makes these connections, students in other Asian and Pacific islands feel encouraged to share what they know, starting rich discussions where students can learn from each other.

Chloe, a K-2 teacher at Tiny Teaching Shack, added: “As much as possible, I want to highlight API culture and history to make sure my students are aware of the sheer breadth of diversity and differences within that region. There are so many things to choose from – cultural growth stimulated by South Korea’s K-Wave, or the nature and wildlife of a diverse region like Australia – there are usually ways to incorporate these topics into the curriculum for students of all ages. “

Go beyond cultural celebrations and traditions.

While it is important to teach about the diverse culture of Asian and Pacific island communities through tradition and celebration, Donat Lovin’s teacher Stacey urges teachers not to limit their curriculum to just that. Rather, take a critical look at history and past and present injustices and facilitate conversations around alliances and advocacy. “A certain part of history that I would like to see highlighted more often,” he says. I’ve seen the ways it worked. Still, in middle school I remember a few short sentences from my history textbook that seemed to suffice for this huge part of my own family history. “

If you’re looking for resources to teach Asian-Pacific American history and heritage, here are a few from Asian and Pacific Islands educators to get you started:

Free Famous Asian American Digital Research Notebook (Distance Learning)

Free Famous Asian American Digital Research Notebook (Distance Learning)
1st-5th class

Children's Day Tradition in Japan - Digital Resources

Children’s Day Tradition in Japan – Digital Resources
4th-8th grade

Asian Heritage Month Resource Freebie - Evaluation included

Asian Heritage Month Resource Freebie – Evaluation included
4th-8th class

Asian American Pacific Islander Month Divide by Decimal for Education

Asian American Pacific Islander Month Divide by Decimal for Education
5th grade


This post, originally published in 2021, has been updated for 2022.

Graduation poems for students recommended by teachers

A bitter sweet, beautiful time for graduate students, parents and teachers. With the end of a chapter of life, a new chapter begins. Paid with perseverance all week, month and year. Now, it’s time to move on. Graduation poetry is the perfect way to capture these emotional and exciting moments. Here are all of our favorite graduate poems to share with students.

1. Running by Jenny Xie

Graduation Poems - Ongoing

“Don’t think of distance travel as something.”

2. If by Rudyard Kipling

“The world and everything in it is yours.”

“There are thousands to tell you it can’t be done.”

4. Up-heel by Christina Rosetti

Graduation Poetry - Up Hill

“Does the road go all the way up the hill?”

“Here I learned some things and not others.”

“Your whole life is an education that has just begun.”

Graduation Poetry - The Road Was Not Taken

“Two roads split into a yellow wood.”

“… and who goes now and always goes every day”

9. The life of Charlotte Bront

“Yet hope again elastic springs.”

Graduation Poetry - Beyond the Year

“The day that will come is the best day.”

“Whose music is the joy of the world.”

12. Song of Life by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

“Life is real! Life is sincere!”

13. Invictus by William Ernest Henley

Graduation Poetry - Invictus

“I am the master of my destiny.”

14. Joanna Fuchs Award

“Spread your wings: you’re going to fly!”

“And on ambitious feet, safe and proud,
Leaning on the clouds and climbing the stairs! ”

Graduation Poems - Instructions Not To Give Up

“More than a fuchsia funnel from a crab tree …”

“Go, poor, child, and don’t hate yourself.”

18. You by Walt Whitman

“Whoever you are! Claim yourself in any danger!”

Graduation Poetry - My heart leaps

“It simply came to our notice then.

“But can it teach it?”

21. A Blessing of Lucy Tapahonso

“Today we reflect the rainbow of creation.”

22. Remember by Joy Harjo

Graduation Poems - Remember

“Remember the sky that you were born under the sky.”

23. Coming of Age by Taylor Lauren Davis

“You are not perfect, you cannot be perfect in everything.”

“Lift your chin and set your shoulders.”

25. Desire by Henrietta Cordelia Ray

Graduation Poetry - Aspiration

“And don’t dream of the eyes widening, or the darkness coming.”

“I have been a black hole in the classroom for a long time;
It exploits everything without allowing my light to escape. “

“And all men and women are mere players.”

28. The dream of Langston Hughes

Graduation Poems - Dreams

“Life is a bird with broken wings.”

“What’s your character?”

30. Famous by Naomi Shihab Nai

“The river is famous for fish.”

Graduation Poetry - Theory

“You can go from here to there, although there is no going home.”

“We dropped out of school.”

Graduation Poetry - Graduation from college

“Can I hear the summons?”

Did you enjoy this list of the best graduation poems? For more poetry suggestions, be sure to subscribe to our newsletter!

33 graduation poems to inspire students

3 Pep Talk All teachers need to hear now

Nervous about a lesson you teach? Juggling all things? Or just having a hard week?

If you answered yes to any of the above, then we have only one thing: sage advice and words of encouragement from three resilient teachers to get you through the day.

1. Feeling you’re not doing enough?

Let 3rd grade teacher Fletcher Nelson remind you exactly how much Is Doing, you rock star.

A full transcript of this Pep discussion will appear below.

Hey friends, my name is Fletcher Nelson. I’ve been teaching for eight years and now I’m in 3rd grade in Minnesota, and today, I’m here to tell you that you’re doing an amazing job and you’re great.

Teaching is a difficult task. Our work is never done. There is always more we can do. Lessons we may be planning. The data we are looking for. Intervention we may be trying. Assignments we may be grading. And knowing that we can always do something that can confuse our perceptions of ourselves and our teaching ability because we think we are not doing enough.

And I’m here to tell you that you are wrong when you think so. That’s not true. What you are doing is wonderful. Your students are very lucky to have you. Your ideas deserve to be shared. You’re doing enough. The growth that your students have had – academically, and socio-emotionally – is remarkable this year. And they are very lucky to have you.

So make time for yourself. Our work is never done. There is always more we can do to make time for ourselves. Plan a fun trip. Go out with friends. Buy those items in your cart. Because you deserve it

You deserve it. You are a rockstar. Go get it.

2. Does the passion for teaching seem to be gone?

During difficult times, it can be difficult to keep up with the reasons why you joined the profession first. Hear from Jane Beauper how to do more that makes you happy and full.

A full transcript of this Pep discussion will appear below.

Hi everyone, my name is Jane Beaupre, and I’m an Indigenous K-5 teacher in BC, Canada. I have only been teaching in the classroom for over 10 years, and my career in teaching has been very uplifting. I liked it sometimes, felt full and happy in my classroom, but I also had some pretty hard times.

Like many other educators, I was frustrated with all the red tape I had to handle, I felt unhealthy, I felt anxious about teaching through COVID, and had very little appreciation. So I took a long rollercoaster ride on the education train, just like many others.

But having experienced all of the emotions, I still have to do it again. I’ve learned a lot about myself in my career, and I’m a good person for that.

And I think one of the most important things I’ve learned is to teach in my own way. I’ve learned that we don’t have to do it all, or meet the expectations of all my colleagues and administrators. And it’s a very difficult thing to give up. You don’t need everyone to love you, especially on the terms of your productivity or the amount of work you do. And you will quickly burn yourself out if you overwork or try, consciously or unconsciously, people like you. I learned that hard way.

And when I feel my own discomfort in doing everything, for all the people except me, I have created a really negative attitude towards education. And to go through this negativity, I have discovered that we need to clear what we need and want to get a sustainable career. So for me, it was like putting some blinds on my own thoughts and feelings, so that I could do more that made me happy. And I’ve made a big change in realizing that I’m important too.

So, in my day-to-day life, it seemed like I was allowing myself to slow down, I was more aware of what was important to me, and I supported those values. And I tried to do what I liked in my classroom. For example, I am an artistic person, so I have included more art in my lessons so that I can enjoy teaching more.

No matter where you are on your journey, and no matter what season you are in at the moment, I hope you understand that your feelings and well-being are just as important as any other person’s. And allow yourself to maintain the values ​​you need to support your happiness. So you can continue or find a sustainable career in education.

We care for others, but we also care for ourselves.

3. Upset after not going according to a lesson plan?

Don’t worry, you’re just human. And 8th grade teacher La Townya Robinson is here to tell you that it’s okay to make mistakes.

A full transcript of this Pep discussion will appear below. It has been edited for clarity.

Greetings everyone! My name is La Townya, some of you know me as “Teachergram” or Smartstyle on YouTube. I am an 8th grade teacher in Southern California. This is my 16th year of teaching and I am currently teaching social studies, history and language arts.

Now, as I share much of my educational life on social media, some of you may remember watching my videos and my posts: There is nothing wrong with the classroom. “

And I’m here to let you know that it can’t be further from the truth. No matter how hard we try or how much forethought we put into a lesson, it is inevitable that from time to time a lesson will not go the way of our plan. And I’m here to say: “It’s all right.”

Because, yes, as teachers, we are multi-taskers, we are planners, we are type A people, we are at the top of the subject because we can’t afford not to. But above all, we humans and humans make mistakes.

Recently, I was guiding my class to the final stages of the study of westward expansion in the United States. And things were going great! We had this fantastic discussion, the kids were working in a group, and they made these really fun and exciting videos to reflect on what they learned. And I have to admit that, as a teacher, I was feeling pretty good about myself and what I was seeing in my classroom. And with that high sense of confidence and feeling good as a teacher, I thought, “You know what? It would be a really great idea if I could create a Google Quiz for each student group that they could share with their classmates and they would share with each other. Can take quizzes and how I can evaluate their learning. So, I sat down, I created a Google form template, I posted it in the Google classroom, I told the kids you wanted to do it, and I said: “Go ahead, kids , Create! “

Then came the day when it was time to take the first quiz they made. I instructed them, pumped them in and said, “These quizzes should be really easy. You made them for each other.” It posted, sat down, and thought I was going to do something while they were taking their quiz. And in just a few seconds, I heard the following:

“Oh, Mrs. Robinson!”

“Microsoft. Robinson, it’s not working.”

“Mrs. Robinson is able to open the quiz but I can’t open mine.”

I jumped up quickly. I went to the kids who were having problems. I looked once, and I tried to figure out why some kids were able to access the Google Quiz, but other kids didn’t. After a few minutes of trying and trying and trying, I realized I was defeated. This did not work out. And in an excited voice, I just said, “Everyone, turn off your Chromebook.”

At that moment, I realized that I had failed as a teacher because, in my view, I had not done my best to make sure everything was in the right place and now I was disappointing my students. We’re sitting here, they can’t even take their quiz, and I don’t know how to solve the problem.

In retrospect, it really wasn’t that big of a deal. We all survived. The kids still learned. And everything was fine.

Fortunately, with that wisdom comes the realization and reminder that, again, we are human beings as teachers. And people are going to make mistakes. When students think about you and their experience with you, they won’t think about the flawless lessons they gave them or how perfect the Google form was when you were in 8th grade. What they will remember is how you felt about them as a person, as a person. And whether you allow them to see you as a person and as a person. The way a part of them sees you is letting them see that you are making a mistake and how you will recover from that mistake.

I know the last few years have been difficult to teach, and we know that there are now many teachers who are forced to leave the classroom. But, if you’re here and you’re watching it, you’re still in the classroom and still fighting well for your students, remember: your students love you for you. And that love for you will take the lessons that are the worst in your eyes and make them shine in the eyes of your students.


For more teacher mental health tips, check out these blog posts:

Living Wages vs. Minimum Wages

Last night I was reading a discussion on FlyerTalk that raised the question of whether hotel housekeeping staff should be expected. This discussion has turned into a big question of minimum wage versus living wage. This discussion reminds me of two assets that I have highlighted in the past that help students understand why the minimum wage and the living wage are not almost the same thing.

Living Wage Calculator is a great resource hosted by MIT. The Living Wage Calculator displays the current minimum wage and living wage in all fifty U.S. states, counties in each state, and the largest metropolitan area in each state. Information is provided based on individuals and families. For example, in my county, the minimum wage for a single person is .9 16.97 / hour, compared to $ 12.75 whereas for a family of four working adults, the living wage is $ 24.04 / hour versus the minimum wage of $ 12.75 / hour. To support these calculations, the Living Wage Calculator includes a corresponding table of general costs for each given position. These costs include taxes, housing, transportation, childcare and food.

Life on Minimum Wage (link opens a Google Doc) is an activity I created almost thirteen years ago to help my civics students understand how difficult it is to save money when your only job (s) pays the minimum wage without benefits. To win Life at the minimum wage Students need to reach the five financial goals that they choose. In order to earn money, students have to complete their assigned assignments. Students will then need to pay the required bills before using the money for their chosen financial goals. As the game progresses, students will be given “surprise” cards for which they will have to spend money on things like quick tickets, trips to health clinics, and fare increases. The minimum wage includes all the work of life so that if one business reduces production or shuts down, the workers of other businesses are also affected. The goal here is to show the impact of business closure on the economy of a small town.

Important note before using this activity:
I have not adjusted this activity for inflation since 2009. You probably want to do this.

Before you email me about the Browning Rifle Goal Cards, please understand that these were targets chosen by my students in the rural community where hunting is often a family tradition. You are welcome to change that card for use in your own classroom

Thanks to the teachers-quotes you share every year!

Academics have one of the most important but difficult tasks in the world. There are no words to describe the many hats they wear. As Teacher Appreciation Month rolls around, they’ve got that summer vacation! Yet, every year teachers come back ready to take up the challenge again, eager to make a difference in the lives of their students. If you would like to express your gratitude, consider writing a note of gratitude and include one of these thank-you quotes for teachers (a gift card never hurts, either 😉).

A child, a teacher, a pen and a book can change the world. Malala Yousafzai

A child, a teacher, a pen and a book can change the world.  Malala Yousafzai

A teacher is a compass that activates the magnet of curiosity, knowledge and wisdom in the students. – Ever Garrison

A teacher is a compass that activates the magnet of curiosity, knowledge and wisdom in the students.  - Ever Garrison

A good teacher can awaken hope, awaken imagination and awaken love for learning. -Brad Henry

A good teacher can awaken hope, awaken imagination and awaken love for learning.  -Brad Henry

A teacher influences eternity; He can never say where his influence will end. – Henry Brooks Adams

A teacher influences eternity;  He can never say where his influence will end.  - Henry Brooks Adams

Better a poor horse than no horse at all. -Joseph Albers

Better a poor horse than no horse at all.  -Joseph Albers

I am indebted to my father for survival, but to my teacher for survival. – Alexander the Great

I am indebted to my father for survival, but to my teacher for survival.  - Alexander the Great

A good teacher is like a candle – it devours itself to light the way for others. – Mostafa Kamal Ataturk

A good teacher is like a candle - it devours itself to light the way for others.  - Mostafa Kamal Ataturk

A good teacher is one who gradually makes himself unnecessary. – Thomas Carathers

A good teacher is one who gradually makes himself unnecessary.  - Thomas Carathers

The great teacher is not the person who provides the most information, but he is the person in whose presence we become different people. -Ralph Waldo Emerson

The great teacher is not the person who provides the most information, but he is the person in whose presence we become different people.  -Ralph Waldo Emerson

Education gives birth to confidence. Confidence inspires hope. Hope gives birth to peace. – Confucius

Education gives birth to confidence.  Confidence inspires hope.  Hope gives birth to peace.  - Confucius

The highest art of the teacher is to evoke joy in creative expression and knowledge. – Albert Einstein

The highest art of the teacher is to evoke joy in creative expression and knowledge.  - Albert Einstein

Talent without education is like silver. -Benjamin Franklin

A mind, once expanded by a new concept, never returns to its original dimension. – Oliver Wendell Holmes

A mind, once expanded by a new concept, never returns to its original dimension.  - Oliver Wendell Holmes

Those who remember their own education remember the teachers, not the methods and techniques. Teachers are the lifeblood of the education system. – Sydney Hook

Those who remember their own education remember the teachers, not the methods and techniques.  Teachers are the lifeblood of the education system.  - Sydney Hook

Better a poor horse than no horse at all. -Japanese proverb

Better a poor horse than no horse at all.  -Japanese proverb

A brilliant teacher looks back with gratitude, but also with gratitude to those who have touched our human feelings. – Carl Jung

A brilliant teacher looks back with gratitude, but also with gratitude to those who have touched our human feelings.  - Carl Jung

Great teachers empathize with children, respect them and believe that everyone has something special that can be developed. – Ann Lieberman

Great teachers empathize with children, respect them and believe that everyone has something special that can be developed.  - Ann Lieberman

Students don’t care how much you know, unless they know how much you care. – John C. Maxwell

Students don't care how much you know, unless they know how much you care.  - John C.  Maxwell

Be a great role model because you will be the window through which many children can see their future. – Thomas McKinnon

Be a great role model because you will be the window through which many children can see their future.  - Thomas McKinnon

We never forget what we learn with joy. – Alfred Mercier

We never forget what we learn with joy.  - Alfred Mercier

A test of the accuracy of the educational method is the happiness of the child. – Maria Montessori

A test of the accuracy of the educational method is the happiness of the child.  - Maria Montessori

Anyone who does something to help a child in his life is a hero to me. – Fred Rogers

Anyone who does something to help a child in his life is a hero to me.  - Fred Rogers

Most of us have no more than five or six people who remember us. Teachers have thousands of people who remember them for a lifetime. -Andy Rooney

Most of us have no more than five or six people who remember us.  Teachers have thousands of people who remember them all their lives.  -Andy Rooney

The biggest sign of success for a teacher is … being able to say, “The kids are acting like I’m not there now.” – Maria Montessori

The biggest sign of success for a teacher is ...

It is good to teach children to count, but it is best to teach them. – Bob Talbert

It is good to teach children to count, but it is best to teach them.  - Bob Talbert

What a gift for a teacher to see students smile and live up to their potential. That is the reward. Humble to be a witness to something like that. – Mary Valelonga

What a gift for a teacher to see students smile and live up to their potential.  That is the reward.  Humble to be a witness to something like that.  - Mary Valelonga

I think the teaching profession contributes more to the future of our society than any other single profession. – John Wooden

I think the teaching profession contributes more to the future of our society than any other single profession.  - John Wooden

Education is not about filling a bowl, it is about lighting a fire. William Butler Yates

Education is not about filling a bowl, it is about lighting a fire.  William Butler Yates

Like this thanks quote for teachers? Try these team-building quotes for classrooms and schools.

Also, share your favorite quotes in the WeAreTeachers HELPLINE group on Facebook.