Free technology for teachers: tomatoes, templates and fireworks

Good morning from Maine where the sun is rising and it is going to be a beautiful summer day to start a long weekend. I will do the cutting before setting up a water bounce house for my kids to play. The Bounce House is one of the best “epidemic shopping” we’ve had in the spring of 2020. My kids love it and so do I. I hope you have some fun this weekend!

This week I wrap my up Teaching history with the help of technology Of course I’m not hosting any more courses until the fall, but I’ll be hosting a series of personal webinars in the next six weeks. You can learn more about that webinar here.

This week’s most popular post was:

1. Flipgrid is dead!

2. Tool for collecting asynchronous stories

3. Ten best templates for science, social studies, and language arts activities

4. Transforming the traditional learning environment with BookWidget

5. 25 Ideas for Whiteboard Video

6. Enroll in Trakt’s Free Virtual Summer Creator Camp

7. Short lesson about American Independence Day

July and August webinars!
Starting this week I am hosting a series of seven practical ad tech webinars. You can register for one or all seven of them. Read about them here or follow the links below to register

Other places to follow me:

  • The Practical Ad Tech Newsletter comes out every Sunday evening / Monday morning. It contains my favorite tip of the week and the most popular posts of free technology week for teachers
  • My YouTube channel has over 41,000 subscribers watching my short tutorial videos in a wide array of educational technology tools.
  • I’m tweeting as @ Arambirn For fifteen years.
  • The Free Technology Facebook page for teachers has new and old posts from this blog throughout the week.
  • If you are interested in my life outside of education, you can follow me on Instagram or Strava.

This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. Used without permission if viewed elsewhere. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne’s) work include Icons Daily and Daily Dose. Featured image by Richard Byrne.

In 7 ways principals fire teachers

Ask a teacher how they feel about their school principal and see their feedback. You can see their eyes well in tears of gratitude. They could put their hands on their hearts and whisper respectfully, “My principal is amazing.”

They could make one of those shaky movements with their hands, frown a little and say, “Ehh. They’re fine.”

Or they may sigh, close their eyes, and check their pulse to see exactly how much pressure this question puts on their heart function.

I know. I have worked under three people. (Get exactly half the margarita in me and I’ll reveal the worst stories that will make you gasp.)

Several years ago, a Forbes article brought to the fore an idea that had been circulating for a long time: People don’t quit their jobs, they quit their bosses. As teachers, it makes perfect sense to us. We don’t just take leadership from others, we provide it to our students. We understand ভালো better than many professions, I argue যে that we have a personal responsibility to create an environment for our “employees.”

There are countless books and articles about what best leaders and managers do to retain teachers. But sometimes I know what No. It goes a long way, too.

It is more important than ever to know how to retain the talents of the principals instead of firing them. Feel free to send this article to your principal highlighting their biggest areas for improvement! (No, no. Please don’t do that.)

In 7 ways the principals fired their teachers

1. They are out of touch with the demands teachers face.

The few leaders I’ve met have amazed me that teachers have a conveyor belt to move into leadership roles where their memories erase the time, energy and talent needed to be good teachers. A while ago, they were saying to themselves, “I don’t understand. Why these teachers? So anti Manually taking one hour per week for color-code data when I could do it myself in Excel? However, the amount of time spent away from the classroom is not always inversely proportional to the quality of leadership. One of my best principals was out of the classroom long before computers came to school.

2. It’s clear they don’t actually want to be the school leader.

It happens all the time: a teacher realizes it’s time to leave the classroom but wants to stay in education, so they move into a school leadership role. Sometimes this person wants to lead and is suitable for management, and that’s a great fit. Other times, the person may not be able to lead or be good at it but feels stuck. Maybe their family depends on the high salary of the school leadership. Maybe they should actually have a certain number of years of school leadership to be a candidate for another job.

While I fully sympathize with the situation that may motivate a teacher to leave the classroom, it is detrimental to children and teachers that you do not or do not want to be in a leadership position. Just as it is easy to find a teacher who does not want to be there, it is also easy to find a leader who does not want to be there.

3. They have trouble communicating.

As teachers, we all know that developing a communication style is a difficult task that works for a wide range of people. But the key word is “developed.” Effective communication is a skill that needs to be constantly sharpened and standardized, not a checklist item that you can identify and then ignore. Personal Pets Here: If you see that an amazing number of people don’t understand some of your interactions, it’s not that you’re dealing with a mysteriously unequal number of dummies, it’s You didn’t communicate as effectively as you thought you did.

4. They do not understand the importance of boundaries.

It is important for teachers to recognize the above and outside commitments (sports and debate instructors, drama and music teachers, I see you). But often in teaching, the narrative glorifies those who dedicate themselves the most. Principals should be careful not only to emphasize the importance of self-care for their employees, but also to establish practices that support teachers. Respecting our planning time, keeping in line with parents, typing a staff meeting as an email during a particularly demanding week — all go a long way. In a similar vein, I’ve heard the term “we do what’s best for kids” which was used almost as a threat for teachers to commit outside of reasonable subjects. You can still do the best work for kids in terms of a healthy, balanced teacher.

5. They try to avoid conflict and / or criticism.

The best principals I’ve worked for often talked about the importance of embracing conflict for growth. It was enlightening for me to hear because I never heard positive talk about conflict from the school leader, let alone as something necessary for a healthy team. In fact, I have worked for many principals in the past who were very clear that our school was a positivity-only zone (i.e., an area of ​​toxic positivity). Taking critical feedback is equally important. I mentioned that the same principal was very diligent in finding ways to improve it on a regular basis, can respond and follow them. I’m not saying that conflict and criticism are easy to embrace – I’ve received many student feedback forms with which I’ve been insulted that I still appreciate their creativity year after year – but it’s necessary. Often, the van-diagram of principals is a circle of people who claim to be good vibes and who never want to know feedback from employees.

6. They do not know how to create and maintain a safe and collaborative work environment.

When teachers are faithful and empowered to do their work, they will improve. Conversely, when teachers ’efforts are thwarted by micromanagement and strict rules, they will fail. The best principals can find the sweet spot in holding teachers accountable while giving them the freedom and flexibility to work. (Note: I urge you, when launching a new disciplinary action, please do not tell your staff “this is not a goth.”

7. They forget to lead by example.

As a teacher, saying one thing and showing another is frustrating. For example, on dynamic and engaging teaching … we will be asked to sit quietly through a two-hour presentation reading directly from a PowerPoint. Or we have been told the importance of giving students grace for submitting projects late or for being too late, but then we will be punished if We Arriving late Students ’expectations are obviously different from adults’ expectations, but I think leaders are justified in the kind of drive, heart and attitude they expect from their teachers. You want to see change, folks.

To any major reading this: I can’t imagine how hard your work has been, especially in recent years. I have respect for every minute you don’t cry by locking your door under your desk. If you find yourself reading these and thinking, “Yes. This is an area where I can improve,” which is a good thing!

From teachers everywhere: We see you. People are being managed Tough.

We know. We can’t shoot ourselves.

What other ways do principals fire their teachers? Let us know in the comments.

For more articles like this, please subscribe to our newsletter.

Help! My rich team teacher is wasting his students with gifts

Dear WeAreTeachers:
My fellow teachers don’t have to work. Teaching is his legitimate hobby. He spends most of the money he earns in his class, if not all. He buys outstanding gifts for all his students and even orders almost weekly dordash / pizza. Now I’m not saying he’s not a great teacher. He usually likes his job, but being his teammate is tiring. I am a single parent who needs to teach and work in the attendance program so that I can finish. And yet her class has a pizza party every Friday. I can say it annoys my students that they don’t get matching shirts, special lunches and expensive gifts to wear. I think I’m not good enough at times. – Love can’t buy me

Dear CBML,
It is very common for us to fall into the trap of comparison in our personal and professional contexts. You are working hard for your family and seeing day by day for your students. Your value is not based on what your teammates do or don’t do. And your teammate’s materialistic approach sounds pretty extreme. Behavior has meaning and perhaps this teacher feels somewhat insecure with the core, complex aspects of teaching. This teacher may like kids, but shower students with gifts Accessories What a great teacher it is. Do you hear students repeatedly say, “What do I get?”

Take a few moments to think about your favorite teachers throughout all seasons of your life. What made them effective and memorable for you? I would like to say that your favorite teachers have probably given birth to your curiosity and amazement, encouraging you to engage in self-reflection and build meaningful, empathetic relationships, value multiple perspectives, boost your confidence socially and academically and communicate more effectively. Yes, you can remember a pizza party here and there, but I’m sure lasting memories are more about how you felt and what you learned.

So what’s the problem with focusing on external rewards and materialism? This may sound innocent, but as Adela Hunting writes, “Unfortunately, external motivation can also lead to loss of enjoyment in activities that were previously internally pleasurable. Teachers who focus on gifts, rewards, and rewards can have unintended consequences of overcoming the more subtle joy of learning and progress.

We’ve all seen temporary spikes of emotion while showering with gifts. The point is, it has no lasting effect. “It should come as no surprise to anyone who tracks the science of happiness, which suggests that material things cannot enhance our happiness in a sustainable or meaningful way. Indeed, research suggests that materialistic people are less happy than their peers. They feel less positive emotions. , Less satisfied with life and suffering from higher levels of anxiety, depression and substance abuse. ” So, your students may be fascinated by things, but who you are as a person affects them more than what you buy.

It’s so easy to focus on what you can control and it’s hard to keep up with the practice. Let’s try to stay in your alley, ready with family, your well-being, strong relationships with your students and your plans and guidance. I argue that the role of teachers as your team partner professional is diminishing, and if you have the strength and courage, try to have a conversation with a trusted leader on your site to share what you are noticing and feeling.

Dear WeAreTeachers:
I had pudding and sprite at my year-end party. And I know it went against the rules, but I think it was okay for the last day. Remember, the admin has previously rewarded appearances with Popsicles. I guess my kids said one or the other, but the administrator found out. When it was time for dismissal, suddenly our interlocutor came to my door telling me that he was taking my kids to the gate. And he shared that my principal and AP are coming to talk to me. I couldn’t say goodbye to my students, hug them or let my parents take pictures with me. Instead, I sat in my classroom and handed over a written warning for policy violations. Do you have any advice? -Time is everything

Dear TIE,
Happy summer to you! I hope you find a way to recharge. The end of the school year is always so full of activity and passion. I’m sure you’re not the only teacher to celebrate this exciting time with some sweet treats. The point is, timing matters. You should have walked to your kids’ gate, and I’m sorry you had to feel the warmth, the gratitude, the relief, and the shock of the connection fading. While missing the final farewell was frustrating and amazing, I hope you know that your impact transcends and endures this kind of snuff.

Let your principal know that it was annoying to miss walking outside with your kids for the last day of dismissal. We all know that relationships are the heart of education!

The schools are full of hypocrisy. A good example is the principal who passes out the popsicles and then rules you out for a small treat on the last day. Counseling agency Straight Talk explains that “everyone has a tendency to be hypocritical at some point. It is virtually impossible to survive entirely in our own moral code, because we are all human beings who make mistakes. We may sincerely believe in objective morality, but we make excuses when it comes to our mistakes. “

So, yes, we all make mistakes and this sweet treat is a secondary one. And maybe your principal thinks their rewards are worthy and not your year-end party.

It is understandable that schools have become more strict about food over the years. In some places, food is often used as an external stimulus. I knew that every birthday celebration and prize party centered on junk food. My daughters ate pizza, chips and cupcakes at school several times a month. There are many people who have eating restrictions (including my kids), and inevitably some students have dropped out due to health problems. This can feel awful to a student. Although some teachers arrange alternatives, it often seems uncomfortable for children.

I’ve tried to get parents of elementary-school-aged kids to spend money on beautifully read books instead of processed foods but it never got traction. Imagine a birthday celebration where the child presents a favorite book in class and the teacher has a special seat in front while reading. The bookplate inside can be a meaningful offering for the child and the classroom library will also be filled with these personal treasures.

Dear WeAreTeachers:
My principal met with me one by one and shared the news that they thought it was time for me to try a grade-level change. They even said that the sixth grade team would benefit a lot from getting me. The truth is I am very nervous about changing my grade-level from kindergarten to sixth grade. I like to be with the little ones, although it can be so much more modeled and the tasks can be broken down into digestible parts. Sixth-grade math feels awful and I’m worried that the kids won’t relate to me or like me. I’m also insecure that they’re removing me because they think I didn’t do well enough. Should I transfer to school or try sixth grade once? – Sixth grade scares me

Dear SGSM,
Grade changes can bring a lot of mixed emotions! It’s normal to feel a little shaky at the moment. And believe that what you know and what you do well with young students will also help you in the sixth-grade classroom setting. Attending your teacher, intentional planning, instruction, monitoring progress, and establishing a caring classroom community are important in any of your grades.

So many educators feel a kind of fear about working with older students. Often people think that sixth graders lack motivation or interest in school. This can happen in some situations, and we still have the ability to create an inviting, welcoming, engaging classroom culture. I say try the sixth grade once. Either way, whether you choose a new grade level or a new school, you need to do some extra work.

Try not to take grade-level change as a negative. Principals are often working to create more effective team dynamics based on the strengths of teachers. Yes, sixth grade is often the first year of middle school and it is full of all kinds of changes and challenges. But you can do it! Your grade-level team can help you change and organize for complex ideas, especially math. Be honest with your principal and let them know that you will appreciate some on-the-clock planning and collaboration time with your team.

Your sixth graders will appreciate the choice, the freedom and the responsibility. Consider taking children out for meaningful, relevant, and hands-on learning experiences. Richard Lowe has written several books on the role of nature for children in shaping a meaningful life. Mixing “Vitamin N (Nature)” with your students can really inspire and inspire.

Your older students need support and guidance when they grow up. Dive in and enjoy the deep connections and ideas that you can feel together. The WeAreTeachers community has put together some excellent sixth-grade resources to boost your confidence and excitement about this big change time.

Do you have a burning question? Email us at [email protected]

Dear WeAreTeachers:
I have just finished my first year of teaching and are officially on summer vacation. I noticed that any time my husband is reminded that I won’t be working for the next three months, it really goes under his skin. He didn’t actually say anything rude or pick any fight with me about it but just commented here and there. “It’s getting late আছে well, I don’t think it’s for you anymore.” I think it’s more of a jealous thing, because he doesn’t like his job and his salary is lower than mine. I think it’s hard to accept that I’m getting this “prok” with a higher salary. So how do I remedy this situation?

Want more advice columns? Check out our Ask WeAreTeachers Hub.

In 7 ways principals fire teachers

Ask a teacher how they feel about their school principal and see their feedback. You can see their eyes well in tears of gratitude. They could put their hands on their hearts and whisper respectfully, “My principal is amazing.”

They could make one of those shaky movements with their hands, frown a little and say, “Ehh. They’re fine.”

Or they may sigh, close their eyes, and check their pulse to see exactly how much pressure this question puts on their heart function.

I know. I have worked under three people. (Get exactly half the margarita in me and I’ll reveal the worst stories that will make you gasp.)

Several years ago, a Forbes article brought to the fore an idea that had been circulating for a long time: People don’t quit their jobs, they quit their bosses. As teachers, it makes perfect sense to us. We don’t just take leadership from others, we provide it to our students. We understand ভালো better than many professions, I argue যে that we have a personal responsibility to create an environment for our “employees.”

There are countless books and articles about what best leaders and managers do to retain teachers. But sometimes I know what No. It goes a long way, too.

It is more important than ever to know how to retain the talents of the principals instead of firing them. Feel free to send this article to your principal highlighting their biggest areas for improvement! (No, no. Please don’t do that.)

In 7 ways the principals fired their teachers

1. They are out of touch with the demands teachers face.

The few leaders I’ve met have amazed me that teachers have a conveyor belt to move into leadership roles where their memories erase the time, energy and talent needed to be good teachers. A while ago, they were saying to themselves, “I don’t understand. Why these teachers? So anti Manually taking one hour per week for color-code data when I could do it myself in Excel? However, the amount of time spent away from the classroom is not always inversely proportional to the quality of leadership. One of my best principals was out of the classroom long before computers came to school.

2. It’s clear they don’t actually want to be the school leader.

It happens all the time: a teacher realizes it’s time to leave the classroom but wants to stay in education, so they move into a school leadership role. Sometimes this person wants to lead and is suitable for management, and that’s a great fit. Other times, the person may not be able to lead or be good at it but feels stuck. Maybe their family depends on the high salary of the school leadership. Maybe they should actually have a certain number of years of school leadership to be a candidate for another job.

While I fully sympathize with the situation that may motivate a teacher to leave the classroom, it is detrimental to children and teachers that you do not or do not want to be in a leadership position. Just as it is easy to find a teacher who does not want to be there, it is also easy to find a leader who does not want to be there.

3. They have trouble communicating.

As teachers, we all know that developing a communication style is a difficult task that works for a wide range of people. But the key word is “developed.” Effective communication is a skill that needs to be constantly sharpened and standardized, not a checklist item that you can identify and then ignore. Personal Pets Here: If you see that an amazing number of people don’t understand some of your interactions, it’s not that you’re dealing with a mysteriously unequal number of dummies, it’s You didn’t communicate as effectively as you thought you did.

4. They do not understand the importance of boundaries.

It is important for teachers to recognize the above and outside commitments (sports and debate instructors, drama and music teachers, I see you). But often in teaching, the narrative glorifies those who dedicate themselves the most. Principals should be careful not only to emphasize the importance of self-care for their employees, but also to establish practices that support teachers. Respecting our planning time, keeping in line with parents, typing a staff meeting as an email during a particularly demanding week — all go a long way. In a similar vein, I’ve heard the term “we do what’s best for kids” which was used almost as a threat for teachers to commit outside of reasonable subjects. You can still do the best work for kids in terms of a healthy, balanced teacher.

5. They try to avoid conflict and / or criticism.

The best principals I’ve worked for often talked about the importance of embracing conflict for growth. It was enlightening for me to hear because I never heard positive talk about conflict from the school leader, let alone as something necessary for a healthy team. In fact, I have worked for many principals in the past who were very clear that our school was a positivity-only zone (i.e., an area of ​​toxic positivity). Taking critical feedback is equally important. I mentioned that the same principal was very diligent in finding ways to improve it on a regular basis, can respond and follow them. I’m not saying that conflict and criticism are easy to embrace – I’ve received many student feedback forms with which I’ve been insulted that I still appreciate their creativity year after year – but it’s necessary. Often, the van-diagram of principals is a circle of people who claim to be good vibes and who never want to know feedback from employees.

6. They do not know how to create and maintain a safe and collaborative work environment.

When teachers are faithful and empowered to do their work, they will improve. Conversely, when teachers ’efforts are thwarted by micromanagement and strict rules, they will fail. The best principals can find the sweet spot in holding teachers accountable while giving them the freedom and flexibility to work. (Note: I urge you, when launching a new disciplinary action, please do not tell your staff “this is not a goth.”

7. They forget to lead by example.

As a teacher, saying one thing and showing another is frustrating. For example, on dynamic and engaging teaching … we will be asked to sit quietly through a two-hour presentation reading directly from a PowerPoint. Or we have been told the importance of giving students grace for submitting projects late or for being too late, but then we will be punished if We Arriving late Students ’expectations are obviously different from adults’ expectations, but I think leaders are justified in the kind of drive, heart and attitude they expect from their teachers. You want to see change, folks.

To any major reading this: I can’t imagine how hard your work has been, especially in recent years. I have respect for every minute you don’t cry by locking your door under your desk. If you find yourself reading these and thinking, “Yes. This is an area where I can improve,” which is a good thing!

From teachers everywhere: We see you. People are being managed Tough.

We know. We can’t shoot ourselves.

What other ways do principals fire their teachers? Let us know in the comments.

For more articles like this, please subscribe to our newsletter.

Dinosaur information for kids that will surprise and amaze your students!

We love dinosaurs, don’t we? Whether it’s visiting a museum to learn more about fossils or going to the movie theater for a Jurassic-themed blockbuster, we can’t get enough. But what do we actually know about dinosaurs? We’ve put together this list of incredible dinosaur information for kids to share with your students. You won’t believe some of these tidbits!

1. words Dinosaurs Comes from the Greek language.

The word dinosaur comes from the Greek language.

The term was coined in 1842 by the English paleontologist Richard Owen Dinosaurs I mean “terrible lizards” but it’s not because they’re scary — it means their huge size!

2. Dinosaurs have ruled the earth for more than 150 million years.

Dinosaurs ruled the earth for more than 150 million years.

Lizard-like reptiles were the main creatures on this planet and some of them still have the largest, most terrifying creatures! Beginning about 230 million years ago, dinosaurs roamed the planet from the Triassic era through the Jurassic era to the end of the Cretaceous era about 65 million years ago.

3. Dinosaurs became extinct about 65.5 million years ago.

Dinosaurs became extinct about 65.5 million years ago.

No one is sure why the dinosaurs died. Some believe that the climate has become too hot or too cold for their existence. Others say that a giant asteroid collided with the Earth — if this is true, then why did some species, including the ancestors of frogs, turtles and even birds, survive? It’s a mystery! Watch this video to explore some theories.

4. Baby Tyrannosaurus was probably adorable.

Baby Tyrannosaurus was probably adorable.

The ferocious adult T-Rex was the king of the dinosaurs, however Rebirth of their young children The American Museum of Natural History is amazingly beautiful!

5. The largest were land-based dinosaurs Argentinosaurus hinculensis.

Incredibly, these giant dinosaurs can reach 130 feet in length! Check out this video about the biggest dinosaur!

6. The name of the first dinosaur was Megalosaurus.

The first dinosaur was named Megalosaurus.

Watch this video about the discovery of the first dinosaur in 1824.

7. The oldest dinosaur is the europtor.

The oldest dinosaur is the europtor.

We are still learning about dinosaurs, but the oldest known to us at the moment is the europtor, an omnivore that roamed the earth about 230 million years ago.

8. Paleontologists study dinosaurs.

Fossils study dinosaurs.

What do paleontologists do? This video will help you “dig” and learn more!

9. Dinosaur fossils were first discovered in the early 1800s.

Dinosaur fossils were first discovered in the early 1800s.

These remains have been preserved in the rock and give us a better idea of ​​the dinosaurs and how they lived.

10. Scientists believe that birds came from dinosaurs.

Scientists believe that the birds came from dinosaurs.

Fossils also say that dinosaurs were cousins ​​of lizards, snakes and crocodiles! Watch this video from National Geographic to answer the question: Are birds modern-day dinosaurs?

11. Many adult dinosaurs had feathers.

Many adult dinosaurs had feathers.

The largest known was the feathered dinosaur Yutyrannus huali (See this to learn more about this super-hunter!) This cousin of the T-Rex was 30 feet tall and probably relied on its feathers to stay warm. Other types of dinosaurs had flying feathers that they flew!

12. Dinosaurs and humans did not coexist.

Dinosaurs and humans were not together.

Humans did not appear on Earth until about 65 million years after the extinction of the dinosaurs.

13. Not all dinosaurs were carnivorous.

Not all dinosaurs were carnivorous.

Many large dinosaurs, including Brachiosaurus and Apatosaurus, were herbivores. To protect themselves from their carnivorous opponents, many had natural weapons such as horns as spikes or shields on their tails.

14. Dinosaur fossils have been found on every continent.

Dinosaur fossils have been found on every continent.

Dinosaurs lived all over the world in a variety of environments and climates, from arid, sandy deserts to tropical forests.

15. We drink the same water as dinosaurs.

We drink the same water as dinosaurs.

Billions of years ago, water came to Earth, probably as meteorite ice that crashed into the new planet. These same water molecules continue to evaporate, condense into clouds, and rain down. This means we are all drinking the same water that dinosaurs did millions of years ago!

16. Pterodactyls are not dinosaurs.

Pterodactyls are not dinosaurs.

Dinosaurs had a lot in common with these flying reptiles and their existence was overlapped, but by definition they are not dinosaurs. This video from the American Museum of Natural History explains why. They were, of course, the first reptiles able to fly!

17. Some dinosaurs were smaller than chickens.

Some dinosaurs were smaller than chickens.

The microraptor, for example, was a small carnivore that weighed about two pounds and was small enough to fit in the hands of an adult. It had flying feathers on its legs that helped it move from branch to branch.

18. The dinosaurs were colorful.

The dinosaurs were colorful.

Although scientists believe the dinosaurs were gray, green or brown, new research has revealed that they were probably more colorful than that! For example, Sinosauropteryx was a turkey-shaped dinosaur that was probably orange and white with a striped tail. Fossils also suggest that Kaihong Juji was a rainbow with shiny, sharp feathers on his chest and neck!

19. Dinosaurs lay eggs.

Dinosaurs lay eggs.

Most dinosaurs lay eggs and build large nests to protect their young and keep them together.

20. Young dinosaurs grow rapidly.

The young dinosaurs grew rapidly.

Notably, dinosaurs have reached their full size, or adulthood, in just seven or eight years!

21. Some dinosaurs had long lifespans.

Some dinosaurs had long lifespans.

It is believed that some large dinosaurs can live about 100 years.

22. Not all dinosaurs existed at the same time.

Not all dinosaurs existed at the same time.

Over millions of years, new dinosaur species emerged while others became extinct at different times. By the time T-Rex survived, Stegosaurus was already a fossil!

23. Dinosaurs get sick.

There is evidence that non-avian dinosaurs suffered from shortness of breath and developed symptoms such as colds and coughs.

24. Dinosaurs liked to steal.

Dinosaurs loved to steal.

One of the most amazing dinosaur information for kids was that these animals snatched. Fossils were discovered about 70 million years ago by the fossil skeletons of three young Oviraptorosors that were stuck together. It is possible that they were living together for protection or to stay warm.

25. We haven’t found all the dinosaurs yet.

We haven't found all the dinosaurs yet.

Science is to find the answer to the question and then ask more questions! New species of dinosaurs are found all the time, which gives us a clear idea of ​​what their life was like. This helps us to better understand the species we have already found Isn’t science amazing?

What is your favorite dinosaur information for kids? Share in the comments below!

Want more articles like this? Confirm our newsletter subscription.

Dinosaur information for kids that will surprise and amaze your students!

We love dinosaurs, don’t we? Whether it’s visiting a museum to learn more about fossils or going to the movie theater for a Jurassic-themed blockbuster, we can’t get enough. But what do we actually know about dinosaurs? We’ve put together this list of incredible dinosaur information for kids to share with your students. You won’t believe some of these tidbits!

1. words Dinosaurs Comes from the Greek language.

The word dinosaur comes from the Greek language.

The term was coined in 1842 by the English paleontologist Richard Owen Dinosaurs I mean “terrible lizards” but it’s not because they’re scary — it means their huge size!

2. Dinosaurs have ruled the earth for more than 150 million years.

Dinosaurs ruled the earth for more than 150 million years.

Lizard-like reptiles were the main creatures on this planet and some of them still have the largest, most terrifying creatures! Beginning about 230 million years ago, dinosaurs roamed the planet from the Triassic era through the Jurassic era to the end of the Cretaceous era about 65 million years ago.

3. Dinosaurs became extinct about 65.5 million years ago.

Dinosaurs became extinct about 65.5 million years ago.

No one is sure why the dinosaurs died. Some believe that the climate has become too hot or too cold for their existence. Others say that a giant asteroid collided with the Earth — if this is true, then why did some species, including the ancestors of frogs, turtles and even birds, survive? It’s a mystery! Watch this video to explore some theories.

4. Baby Tyrannosaurus was probably adorable.

Baby Tyrannosaurus was probably adorable.

The ferocious adult T-Rex was the king of the dinosaurs, however Rebirth of their young children The American Museum of Natural History is amazingly beautiful!

5. The largest were land-based dinosaurs Argentinosaurus hinculensis.

Incredibly, these giant dinosaurs can reach 130 feet in length! Check out this video about the biggest dinosaur!

6. The name of the first dinosaur was Megalosaurus.

The first dinosaur was named Megalosaurus.

Watch this video about the discovery of the first dinosaur in 1824.

7. The oldest dinosaur is the europtor.

The oldest dinosaur is the europtor.

We are still learning about dinosaurs, but the oldest known to us at the moment is the europtor, an omnivore that roamed the earth about 230 million years ago.

8. Paleontologists study dinosaurs.

Fossils study dinosaurs.

What do paleontologists do? This video will help you “dig” and learn more!

9. Dinosaur fossils were first discovered in the early 1800s.

Dinosaur fossils were first discovered in the early 1800s.

These remains have been preserved in the rock and give us a better idea of ​​the dinosaurs and how they lived.

10. Scientists believe that birds came from dinosaurs.

Scientists believe that the birds came from dinosaurs.

Fossils also say that dinosaurs were cousins ​​of lizards, snakes and crocodiles! Watch this video from National Geographic to answer the question: Are birds modern-day dinosaurs?

11. Many adult dinosaurs had feathers.

Many adult dinosaurs had feathers.

The largest known was the feathered dinosaur Yutyrannus huali (See this to learn more about this super-hunter!) This cousin of the T-Rex was 30 feet tall and probably relied on its feathers to stay warm. Other types of dinosaurs had flying feathers that they flew!

12. Dinosaurs and humans did not coexist.

Dinosaurs and humans were not together.

Humans did not appear on Earth until about 65 million years after the extinction of the dinosaurs.

13. Not all dinosaurs were carnivorous.

Not all dinosaurs were carnivorous.

Many large dinosaurs, including Brachiosaurus and Apatosaurus, were herbivores. To protect themselves from their carnivorous opponents, many had natural weapons such as horns as spikes or shields on their tails.

14. Dinosaur fossils have been found on every continent.

Dinosaur fossils have been found on every continent.

Dinosaurs lived all over the world in a variety of environments and climates, from arid, sandy deserts to tropical forests.

15. We drink the same water as dinosaurs.

We drink the same water as dinosaurs.

Billions of years ago, water came to Earth, probably as meteorite ice that crashed into the new planet. These same water molecules continue to evaporate, condense into clouds, and rain down. This means we are all drinking the same water that dinosaurs did millions of years ago!

16. Pterodactyls are not dinosaurs.

Pterodactyls are not dinosaurs.

Dinosaurs had a lot in common with these flying reptiles and their existence was overlapped, but by definition they are not dinosaurs. This video from the American Museum of Natural History explains why. They were, of course, the first reptiles able to fly!

17. Some dinosaurs were smaller than chickens.

Some dinosaurs were smaller than chickens.

The microraptor, for example, was a small carnivore that weighed about two pounds and was small enough to fit in the hands of an adult. It had flying feathers on its legs that helped it move from branch to branch.

18. The dinosaurs were colorful.

The dinosaurs were colorful.

Although scientists believe the dinosaurs were gray, green or brown, new research has revealed that they were probably more colorful than that! For example, Sinosauropteryx was a turkey-shaped dinosaur that was probably orange and white with a striped tail. Fossils also suggest that Kaihong Juji was a rainbow with shiny, sharp feathers on his chest and neck!

19. Dinosaurs lay eggs.

Dinosaurs lay eggs.

Most dinosaurs lay eggs and build large nests to protect their young and keep them together.

20. Young dinosaurs grow rapidly.

The young dinosaurs grew rapidly.

Notably, dinosaurs have reached their full size, or adulthood, in just seven or eight years!

21. Some dinosaurs had long lifespans.

Some dinosaurs had long lifespans.

It is believed that some large dinosaurs can live about 100 years.

22. Not all dinosaurs existed at the same time.

Not all dinosaurs existed at the same time.

Over millions of years, new dinosaur species emerged while others became extinct at different times. By the time T-Rex survived, Stegosaurus was already a fossil!

23. Dinosaurs get sick.

There is evidence that non-avian dinosaurs suffered from shortness of breath and developed symptoms such as colds and coughs.

24. Dinosaurs liked to steal.

Dinosaurs loved to steal.

One of the most amazing dinosaur information for kids was that these animals snatched. Fossils were discovered about 70 million years ago by the fossil skeletons of three young Oviraptorosors that were stuck together. It is possible that they were living together for protection or to stay warm.

25. We haven’t found all the dinosaurs yet.

We haven't found all the dinosaurs yet.

Science is to find the answer to the question and then ask more questions! New species of dinosaurs are found all the time, which gives us a clear idea of ​​what their life was like. This helps us to better understand the species we have already found Isn’t science amazing?

What is your favorite dinosaur information for kids? Share in the comments below!

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Five ideas for a classroom app

On Wednesday I published a post about creating your own mobile apps for classroom use. If you’ve read that post and are wondering why teachers want to take on the task of creating their own app or want students to do it, here are five ideas for classroom apps.

1. Create a Mobile Study Guide: This is the first thing I thought of when I discovered Glide Apps. You or your students can create an app that lists each section or unit in your curriculum. In each section you can provide videos, podcasts or links to additional documents for review.

2. Create a mobile version of the school handbook: When parents have a question about your school, their first instinct is probably to pick up their phone to search your school’s website or call the office. A mobile version of your school’s handbook can make it easier for parents to quickly find answers to frequently asked questions.

3. Create a guide for your community: Are you looking for a community service project for your high school or high school students? If so, consider creating a guide for them to highlight your community.

4. Develop a mobile reporting system: Are your students or parents using Google Forms to log information about multiple goals, such as independent reading, outdoor play, or behavioral goals? If so, consider putting a link to all those forms in a convenient app You can do this by placing links to your forms in the columns of your spreadsheet before publishing it via Glide.

5. Room usage schedule: For many years I worked at a school that had more teachers than the classroom so it was always a game of guessing who was using which house. Having an app that is easy to find out which rooms are being used at any given time would be amazing! With the Glide app you can create such apps.

Free technology for teachers: bikes, bubbles and forms

Good evening from Maine where the sun is going down in June. Despite having a bit of bad weather to start the month, we’re ending up with a great stretch of warm and sunny weather that’s perfect for playing outside. I hope you had a great month!

This month I organized my Teaching History with Technology course. In July and August I am hosting another series of practical ad tech webinars. You can learn more about them and register here.

As I do at the end of each month, I walk through my Google Analytics account to find the ten most popular posts from the last thirty days. Take a look and see there are some interesting things you missed in June.

This month’s most popular post was:

1. World Bicycle Day Lessons
2. Tool for collecting asynchronous stories
3. Five great chrome extensions for teachers
4. 45 canvas tutorials for teachers and students
5. A TED-Ed lesson for each component in the periodic table
6. Videos for teaching and learning about Memorial Day
7. Here are five ways to work with PDF in Google Drive
8. Two ways to quickly turn text into video
9. Unprepared Bubbles – Another fun summer science lesson
10. New Google Form Customization Options

July and August webinars!
Starting July I have been hosting a series of seven practical ad tech webinars. You can register for one or all seven of them. Read about them here or follow the links below to register

Other places to follow me:

  • The Practical Ad Tech Newsletter comes out every Sunday evening / Monday morning. It contains my favorite tip of the week and the most popular posts of free technology week for teachers
  • My YouTube channel has over 41,000 subscribers watching my short tutorial videos in a wide array of educational technology tools.
  • I’m tweeting as @ Arambirn For fifteen years.
  • The Free Technology Facebook page for teachers has new and old posts from this blog throughout the week.
  • If you are interested in my life outside of education, you can follow me on Instagram or Strava.

This post originally appeared on FreeTech4Teachers.com. Used without permission if viewed elsewhere. Sites that steal my (Richard Byrne’s) work include Icons Daily and Daily Dose. Featured image by Richard Byrne.

15 Classroom Decoration Resources and Bulletin Board Ideas

A new school year means a new classroom – or a chance to refresh your current set-up! Prepare your room for school with these simple bulletin board ideas and classroom decor. How you set up your room can help you stay organized, clear expectations to students, and create a fun and exciting learning environment for your class. Here are some resources to get you started

The purpose of learning is bulletin board

Set the tone for your students’ day so that they know what they will learn as soon as they enter the room. This fun set of editable posters and symbols will ensure that your class knows their learning objectives inside and out.

The purpose of learning Bulletin Board | Objective Board | Classroom Decor by Learning in Wonderland

Grade: K-3

Classroom Deco Pennant Banner by Ordinary to Extraordinary Classroom

Grade: K-12

Classroom work decor ideas

Taking care of the classroom is a task that your students can actively participate in. With these posters and worksheets let your wall decor also become a classroom management tool.

Classroom Work and Work Posters and Worksheet Bundles Made Easy aka Speed ​​Adulting by Adults

Grade: Not specific

Classroom Jobs: Classroom Decor Editable by Lindsay Flood

Grade: 3-8

Social Emotional Learning Poster

Encourage your students’ mental growth through these SEL posters that address mindfulness, stress management, growth mindset, coping skills and much more. Not only will this classroom decor concept look great, but it will help ensure that your learning space is an inclusive one.

Social Emotional Learning Poster Bundle: SEL Classroom and School Counseling Decorations by Wholehearted School Counseling

Grade: K-9

Classroom expectations

Classroom decor can be fun And Set up your class for success by clearing your rules, procedures and expectations with these quick and easy digital and print resources that work.

Classroom Methods and Expectations {Editable} PowerPoint – For MS and HS by Science Adventures

Grade: 3-12

Laura Candler’s Whole Brain Teaching Classroom Rules Poster

Grade: PreK-6

Free

Classroom decor by subject

Make what you teach with these posters, bulletin boards, and editable labels part of your classroom theme. These ornaments are full of bright colors as well as teaching materials that match your lesson plan.

Mathematics

Invisible Math Posters and Worksheets – Math Classroom Decor by Amy Harrison

Grade: 6-9

Social education

Nicole Hernandez’s Map Skill Poster – A Teacher’s Idea

Grade: K-3

Science

5E Instructional Model Bulletin Board Poster The next generation of science standards that I have learned

Grade: 2-5

Free

English language art

Print, laminate, and complete the author’s workshop bulletin board! Performs in education

Grade: 3-12

Free

Spanish

Spanish classroom decor Spanish-speaking country’s flag-labeled banner heart Sra Cruz

Grade: K-12

Bilingual classroom labels – now free bilingual classroom labels by Biletrassi

Grade: 1-5

Free

Music

What to listen to on a music bulletin board set by Corey Bloom

Grade: K-12

Art

Art Teaching Quotes – 10 Posters for The Little Teacher Lady’s Classroom Decoration

Grade: 6-12


Looking for more classroom bulletin board ideas and decor? See the TpT ​​catalog for more inspiration.

How to be an alternative teacher

According to a Recent Education Week SurveyAcross the country, 77 percent of school leaders said it was a difficult time to recruit enough alternative teachers to provide adequate coverage for teacher absences. And although deficits vary by schools across states, subject areas, and even districts, one thing is for sure: the value of alternative teachers cannot be overstated. Effective alternative teachers make important contributions to our students, our schools and our communities. If you are wondering how to become an alternative teacher, here are the answers to some common FAQs.

Is alternative education a good thing for me?

Being an alternative teacher is an interesting possibility for many people. If you’re considering a teaching career, this is a great way to test the water before drowning the whole way. For new teachers or those who are moving to new districts, this is a great way to keep your feet on the door. Even if you want to earn some extra money through a flexible part-time job, alternative education can be a great opportunity.

Some questions to ask yourself before deciding to become an alternative teacher include:

  • Do you want to work with children?
  • Are you okay with the possibility of unexpected, part-time work?
  • Being able to set a high priority on your own schedule?
  • Do you like the idea of ​​working with different ages?
  • Are you comfortable covering a wide spectrum of content?
  • Can you give up benefits like vacation pay and health benefits?

It is important to answer this question honestly because, honestly, the job is not for everyone. Priscilla L. She becomes an alternative teacher when her children enter primary school. “It was a perfect fit for our family,” she says. “We could go to school and come home together. It gave me valuable insights into the community where they spent most of their time. “

What skills do you need to become an alternative teacher?

Alternative learning requires a unique mix of skills. First and foremost, patience, empathy and sincere love for children are essential. These skills are also required to do the job well:

Communication

Alternative teachers need to be able to communicate clearly with students and not be afraid to stand in front of the class. In addition, they must be able to work with team teachers and other school staff.

Leadership

One of the most difficult parts of being an alternative teacher is classroom management. Especially if you work with students you have never met before, an air of confidence and (generous) authority is essential.

Flexibility

Each teacher’s classroom community is different. When you enter as an alternative teacher, you need to be able to adapt quickly, adapt and follow the teacher’s plan.

Organization

Every teacher’s nightmare is coming back in time to find a mess in their classroom with no evidence of what was done (or not) when they left. Alternative teachers must be able to keep materials and paperwork organized and accessible to teachers when they return.

Time management

School schedules can be complicated. Alternative teachers must be able to move lessons along and keep students on track. In addition, they must be able to follow the schedule and ensure that students are where they need to be at the right time.

Computer literacy

Many classroom work requires technical skills, ranging from taking attendance to video lessons and accessing smart boards to helping students log into learning apps. Must be comfortable with technology and have knowledge of problem solving techniques.

Creativity

Last but not least, sometimes alternative teachers need to be creative. This may mean having your own special strategy to keep students engaged or knowing what to do when the lesson is flat. Even the most seasoned teachers have a day when everything falls apart. So it’s important to be able to think on your feet.

For more tips on how to be an effective sub and have fun doing it, read our article 50 Tips, Strategies and Ideas for Alternative Teachers.

What are the benefits of being an alternative teacher?

There are many benefits to being an alternative teacher. The work is part-time and flexible. This is a great way to earn a supplemental income while gaining valuable experience. “My time as an alternative was invaluable for my development as a teacher,” says Alyssa E. “I’ve gained experience at different levels on different topics. In addition, I’ve come up with a lot of helpful tips for setting up my classroom community.”

Being an alternative teacher is certainly less stressful than being a full-time classroom teacher. You are not responsible for planning lessons or attending meetings or training. And when students are off for the day, so can you. Also, you can rely on holidays and summer vacations (unless you choose sub for summer school).

And if you go to a list of school choice options, you will really get to know students and teachers and become an important part of the community. “I feel like I’ve become part of the school family,” Ann M. said. He told us 6 “Teachers and principals really value me as part of their staff and know they can count on me. It is very stressful for teachers to take leave. So I am happy to give them peace of mind when they have to leave. ”

After all, you can work with kids! Also, you are proud to make a valuable contribution in a case where a lot is needed.

What are the disadvantages of being an alternative teacher?

As an alternative teacher, you are an intentional employee. This means there is no guarantee of hours or wages. Demand is unexpected and usually does not provide benefits. If you start and work at a different school every day, it’s hard to feel connected. It takes time and exposure to build relationships with students. In addition, let’s just say some teachers plan better than others. If you’re lucky enough to sub for an Uber-organized teacher, the job is a dream. If not, that’s fine – this is where creativity comes into play (see above).

What are the requirements for an alternative teacher?

Rules and regulations for alternative teachers vary widely from state to state. Visit your state Department of Education website to verify the needs of your community. Generally, you must have a valid teaching license or alternative license. Some districts issue temporary licenses, especially those with an urgent need. The level of education required to become a sub also varies by state. Some only require a high school diploma. For others, you need a college degree and perhaps proof of certain coursework.

Other requirements may include a criminal background check and health and immunization certificate. Some districts require safety training such as CPR and first aid. Most school districts have an application process and ask for a letter of recommendation. And once you get hired as an alternative, you may have to attend Adaptation or training sessions.

How much do alternative teachers get paid?

On average, alternative teachers can earn anywhere from $ 75 to $ 200 for a full day’s work. But sub Salary varies greatly from state to state and between urban and rural communities. Some districts offer incentives for high-volume days such as Fridays and Mondays. Some districts vary salaries depending on grade level. Contact your local school district to find out about rates in your area.

Have you recently decided to become an alternative teacher? How are you? Share the comment.

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