Reddit teachers are sharing the warmth of their education and… Wow!

Recently on Reddit, a user asked teachers about their exciting adoption of teaching. If you are lagging behind in your lingo because of the epidemic, the issues of heat are the opinions, questions and observations that people do not always share widely due to their controversial and often irritating nature. It turns out that academics had a lot to say.

From predictable problems of working conditions to less predictable aspects of khakis, no stone was left unturned. Teachers across the country — and in some cases, around the world ছেন have matched their piping-hot commentary. We are much more here for this.

See some of the top responses.

“There’s been too much focus on hiring new teachers, not enough to keep them there.”

“The reason for the shortage of teachers is that teachers initially leave within their first 3-5 years, not the lack of new people entering the profession. For example, my former district has just increased the salary of a new teacher by 60k, but a teacher with 25 years of experience will earn roughly $ 75k if he enters the district. Make it meaningful. “

“In related notes, teacher turnover should be a major factor in school evaluation by state / district. If one-third of your employees resign each year, it’s a bright red flag that someone needs to step on and make meaningful changes. “- EasyTrust 786

“My excitement is that the situation in which teachers have to work will never improve unless enough teachers strike and demand a change in the situation.”

“I know it’s really hard, maybe impossible, to do though. But no one can dream! I hope the number of teachers leaving this year will have some effect. ” – Rabbit_and_moon

“Good adoption: We are in no way prepared or equipped to teach in the 21st century.”

“Reason: Both our funding and the amount and funding of ‘professional’ / vocational training should have matched the massive growth of technology. Today teachers are using methods developed 50-70 years ago.

“PowerPoint, electronic whiteboards, etc. are great tools but we have a lot of information on how to solve learning in order to make learning styles effective and yet our funding has been reduced, our technology bank, our degrees do not focus on new realities of our environment, And our students suffer from being jammed in 30 classrooms at once. ” Intelligence is optional

“You don’t have to wear khaki to be a good teacher.”

“I wore jeans every day of the year and my kids had great scores on exams.” —Kanjila 9009

“The administrator should come with a job limit.”

“It’s very hard to remember what it was like in the classroom for 5 years or so. Put them back in a classroom (at the salary of a classroom teacher) for at least a year before they apply to become administrators again. Many of the best principals I’ve worked with are first-year principals. ” – Who is the teacher?

“New administrators should never evaluate teachers.”

“Teachers have no idea what constitutes reasonable expectations. As an experienced teacher, some of the stupidest or most heinous recommendations have just come from administrators. “- Nothing

“Education is certainly a skill that can be learned, but it also exists It is Factor. “

“You can train someone to be a better teacher or a better presenter of information, but not everyone is a teacher.” Activate_Procrastina

“Politics and armchair quarterback parents have ruined the profession.”

– Coskibum 002

“Teachers are held in low esteem because it is a traditionally women-dominated field, and it will never receive full respect or compensation for it because of the realization that we all have husbands and wives who earn a lot of money to support us in our altruism. “

-Black Widow 1414

“The best part is staying with the students in the classroom. Everything else depends on space, time and administration. “

BBFan121

Really true. Principals in particular can have a huge impact on their teachers ’experience, and kids are always, always the best part.

(Sometimes except when they are not.)

We’d love to hear your hot take on education! Which of the following do you find to be true about education but often hesitate to reveal? Comment and share your thoughts.

Also, for more articles like this, be sure to subscribe to our newsletters.

7 subjects English teachers want to know

Over 10 percent Among students in the United States – more than 5.1 million children and counting – have learned English (ELLs). And although ELLs do not learn differently from their local-English-speaking peers, they have special educational needs. In a new country, a new language, and a New culture. But not all teachers know what to do or how to help these students.

So we talked to an expert and asked for his advice on how to help English language students. Colin Lecampot, a 25-year veteran, is an English language development teacher at Summit View Elementary School in the Highlands Ranch, Colorado.

Here are the things he believes his English language students would know if the teachers knew.

We have a lot to contribute, but we need time to be comfortable.

“Most of my new students have gotten really good education up to this point,” says LeCompte. “They have a lot of background knowledge that they want to share, but they’re not where they’re ready.” It’s understandable চলে moving to a new country, learning new customs, finding expectations:It’s too much. Students need time to process a certain amount of grief to get used to their new situation and, for many, to leave their lives. “The key is to be patient, and not force them to do uncomfortable things,” says LeCompte.

We want our teachers to “drink” us.

“It makes a lot of sense for my students when their teachers have an effective knowledge of their cultural background and where they come from,” says LeCompte. He explains that it is important that ELLs know that we respect their culture and do not need to change it. As an example, there are Asian students at LeCompte who take an English name because they are worried teachers will not be able to pronounce their name. “I pushed that back,” he said. “I’m telling them we’ll work hard to get your name right.” When he meets his students, such as Google Translate to learn more about their language and Google Maps and Google Earth to learn more about their own country, he goes a long way in showing his students that he has invested in them as individuals. Goes 6

If we connect to a subject, we open up.

Involving students is sometimes the hardest part of the job, especially with older kids. But when conversations are about things that are personally meaningful to them, they tend to be open. “My students like to talk at home about their previous school, their family and their friends,” Lecampot said. “The more we can talk to our students, the more we can help them build their skills.”

Building relationships with your ELL students is especially important. Ask them about their interests, their plans, their goals. Spend time, when possible, interacting with them one by one. Creating a classroom environment that is warm, comfortable and acceptable is more important than academic instruction.

Learning programs such as TCM’s language power A great tool to provide A meaningful opportunity for students to make personal connections by sharing their experiences with themselves, their families and languages ​​and celebrating their home culture and language.

We need help navigating cultural differences in the classroom.

American schools can look a lot different from the school our ELL came from, and there are some things to be accustomed to. LeCompte reports that his students are sometimes surprised at how much interaction there is with peers in the classroom and how much our students talk. They wonder why we have holidays and why we don’t go home for lunch. All of these at the same time try to understand how social interactions work, understand our sense of humor and try to understand some of the subtleties of our language, such as satire. They need our support to navigate classroom culture because they are learning to adapt.

Every day, we face more challenges than our peers.

Our ELLS carries a much greater cognitive load — that is, the amount of information that working memory can hold at one time তুল than our native speakers. In addition to the important task of learning a new language, they are learning grade-appropriate educators as well as processing social, emotional, and cultural experiences. It’s a lot like the description of a female dancer doing what men are doing just behind and in the heels. We need to support our students as they work through these demands and make sure our expectations are met. They may need more downtime and obviously one more support after another.

Even though my parents don’t speak English, they really want to get involved.

“There’s a big misconception that ELL parents don’t care,” LeCompte says. “But these parents, like their children, are learning new systems and new school processes.” In fact, most of her students’ parents have high expectations of their children and are concerned that going to school is different from what they are used to. The key is communication. It is important to prioritize helping The family feels welcome and forms a partnership with them.

Just like all kids, we just want to be included and have fun.

It is normal for ELL children to gather together. After all, there is safety in being with your own small group. But, LeCompte explains, it is really important to integrate English language learners. Although all his students are learning a new language, this does not mean that they have everything in common. Just like all students, there are many more aspects of who they are. Help your students connect with children with similar interests. Assign a friend for the first few weeks to help new students connect with someone outside of their circle. Assign mixed teams to the class as often as possible. Finally, encourage community and relationship-building for All Students in your classroom.

What do your English language students want and want in the classroom? We’d love to hear your experience in the comments.

Thanks to our friends for the teacher-made content for sponsoring this post. Check out their language acquisition program to help improve English proficiency in K – 8 grade.

Best 4th grade reading comprehensible activities

By the time students reach fourth grade, they have mastered the basics of phonology and decoding and have begun to dig deeper to understand what they are reading. This is a great time to introduce learning strategies that will help them become lifelong readers. Here are a dozen ways to improve fourth grade reading comprehension.

1. Color-code is your thought

Two colored markers in front of instruction sheets to help you understand fourth grade reading

Highlighting note-taking and reading passages with color can help students differentiate, retain, and transfer knowledge, as well as focus on important information for meaningful learning. Teach your students to use color to highlight paragraphs to help them identify features such as key ideas, descriptions, and vocabulary words. Or use different colors to mark different sections of the graphic organizer.

Learn more: Think, grow, smile

2. Try to think out loud

An Asian girl has a thought bubble over her head and a caption that says "Ask questions"

Another way to improve fourth grade comprehension is to think. When reading a lesson to students, share the questions and answers that are running through your mind. For example, “How does the story make you feel?”

Learn more: Balanced Literacy Diet

3. Watch a story-material rap video

Do you know how they say that learning music helps improve the retention setting? Okay, with this story-material wrap video, kids will see themselves pronouncing the chorus much later. And if rap isn’t your thing, check out this list of our favorite YouTube videos to teach storytelling

4. Play a round of reading comprehension jingle

Zenga games with comprehensible fourth grade reading questions written on the block

Who doesn’t like the thrilling game of jingle? Careful strategy in picking the right block তা rushing to get a block out successfully… the whole tower collapses at the sound! This classroom version is not just a blast, it helps to improve reading comprehension skills. Score a used Zenga set at a garage sale or thrift store, then download this huge collection of comprehensible questions to read fiction and nonfiction from the initial assessment.

Learn more: Remedia Publications

5. Improve vocabulary skills

Five images of vocabulary activities for understanding fourth grade lessons

The more words a student knows, the more they have access to complex reading paragraphs. Practice vocabulary skills in a fun way with these 20 meaningful vocabulary activities. Draw vocabulary sketch notes, play vocabulary risks, join the Million Dollar Word Club and much more.

6. Practice using context formulas

A poster teaches 4th graders how to use contextual clues while reading.

Image Source: Crafting Connection

Being able to use context clues to define unknown words is crucial for all students. This poster and lesson plan on crafting connections will give your students the techniques they need to become a sound detective.

7. Find creative ways to respond to reading

A poster teaches 4th graders how to use contextual clues while reading.

Photo source: An Educators Life

Terrible, old-fashioned, standing in front of class and reading the report of your boring book. How about creating a mint-tin book report? Or a book report cake? Or a mobile or paper bag book report made from a clothes hanger? Here are some creative ways kids can respond to books that we’ve rounded up to get your students excited about reading.

8. Learn about close reading techniques

A classroom poster that looks like a sign post with intimate reading techniques for students

Photo source: De Lu on Pinterest

Close reading is defined as “an intensive analysis of a text so as to know what it says, how it says it, and what it means.” And research shows that teaching students how to close-read helps them become better readers. The strategy is to spice it up so that students can apply the skill of reading closely without getting bored. Here is the idea of ​​an innovative teacher to teach close reading.

9. Create anchor charts together

A collage of techniques for understanding fourth grade reading

From identifying a text to visualizing a character’s journey to understanding, we’ve got fourth grade reading comprehension anchor charts for you! Choose from dozens of color samples for you to create with your students during direct instruction.

10. Introduce metaphorical language

A colorful poster illustrates the difference between an analogy, a metaphor, and a simile

Photo source: YourDictionary.com

Things like metaphors, similes and onmatopoeia make that reading more colorful and interesting. Understanding metaphorical language is a complex literacy skill that will expand your students’ understanding. Focus your lessons around anchor charts in this fantastic metaphorical language.

11. Theme Focus

A paragraph 7 explains the theme of a computer screen and literature with a pink background

Photo source: Upper Elementary Snapshot

In order to fully explore the theme, students must be able to understand what they read and then extract ideas from the text. Here are some tips to help you learn themes in the language industry.

12. Read in line

A table with colorful inference task cards scattered on top

Learning to guess is a key literacy skill and something that all good readers do. When students pause and connect while reading to ask questions, it strengthens their comprehension. To learn more about this, go to Teaching with Mountain View.

Looking for more ways to encourage the burden of fourth grade reading? Check out our list of the top 60 books in 4th grade.

Also, get all the latest learning tips and tricks by signing up for our newsletters!

7 subjects English teachers want to know

Over 10 percent Among students in the United States – more than 5.1 million children and counting – have learned English (ELLs). And although ELLs do not learn differently from their local-English-speaking peers, they have special educational needs. In a new country, a new language, and a New culture. But not all teachers know what to do or how to help these students.

So we talked to an expert and asked for his advice on how to help English language teachers. Colin Lecampot, a 25-year veteran, is an English language development teacher at Summit View Elementary School in the Highlands Ranch, Colorado.

Here are the things he believes his English language students would know if the teachers knew.

We have a lot to contribute, but we need time to be comfortable.

“Most of my new students have gotten really good education up to this point,” says LeCompte. “They have a lot of background knowledge that they want to share, but they’re not where they’re ready.” It’s understandable চলে moving to a new country, learning new customs, finding expectations:It’s too much. Students need time to process a certain amount of grief to get used to their new situation and, for many, to leave their lives. “The key is to be patient, and not force them to do uncomfortable things,” says LeCompte.

We want our teachers to “drink” us.

“It makes a lot of sense for my students when their teachers have an effective knowledge of their cultural background and where they come from,” says LeCompte. He explains that it is important that ELLs know that we respect their culture and do not need to change it. As an example, there are Asian students at LeCompte who take an English name because they are worried teachers will not be able to pronounce their name. “I pushed that back,” he said. “I’m telling them we’ll work hard to get your name right.” When he meets his students, such as Google Translate to learn more about their language and Google Maps and Google Earth to learn more about their own country, he goes a long way in showing his students that he has invested in them as individuals. Goes 6

If we connect to a subject, we open up.

Involving students is sometimes the hardest part of the job, especially with older kids. But when conversations are about things that are personally meaningful to them, they tend to be open. “My students like to talk at home about their previous school, their family and their friends,” Lecampot said. “The more we can talk to our students, the more we can help them build their skills.”

Building relationships with your ELL students is especially important. Ask them about their interests, their plans, their goals. Spend time, when possible, interacting with them one by one. Creating a classroom environment that is warm, comfortable and acceptable is more important than academic instruction.

Learning programs such as TCM’s language power A great tool to provide A meaningful opportunity for students to make personal connections by sharing their experiences with themselves, their families and languages ​​and celebrating their home culture and language.

We need help navigating cultural differences in the classroom.

American schools can look a lot different from the school our ELL came from, and there are some things to be accustomed to. LeCompte reports that his students are sometimes surprised at how much interaction there is with peers in the classroom and how much our students talk. They wonder why we have holidays and why we don’t go home for lunch. All of these at the same time try to understand how social interactions work, understand our sense of humor and try to understand some of the subtleties of our language, such as satire. They need our support to navigate classroom culture because they are learning to adapt.

Every day, we face more challenges than our peers.

Our ELLS carries a much greater cognitive load — that is, the amount of information that working memory can hold at one time তুল than our native speakers. In addition to the important task of learning a new language, they are learning grade-appropriate educators as well as processing social, emotional, and cultural experiences. It’s a lot like the description of a female dancer doing what men are doing just behind and in the heels. We need to support our students as they work through these demands and make sure our expectations are met. They may need more downtime and obviously one more support after another.

Even though my parents don’t speak English, they really want to get involved.

“There’s a big misconception that ELL parents don’t care,” LeCompte says. “But these parents, like their children, are learning new systems and new school processes.” In fact, most of her students’ parents have high expectations of their children and are concerned that going to school is different from what they are used to. The key is communication. It is important to prioritize helping The family feels welcome and forms a partnership with them.

Just like all kids, we just want to be included and have fun.

It is normal for ELL children to gather together. After all, there is safety in being with your own small group. But, LeCompte explains, it is really important to integrate English language learners. Although all his students are learning a new language, this does not mean that they have everything in common. Just like all students, there are many more aspects of who they are. Help your students connect with children with similar interests. Assign a friend for the first few weeks to help new students connect with someone outside of their circle. Assign mixed teams to the class as often as possible. Finally, encourage community and relationship-building for All Students in your classroom.

What do your English language students want and want in the classroom? We’d love to hear your experience in the comments.

Thanks to our friends for the teacher-made content for sponsoring this post. Check out their language acquisition program to help improve English proficiency in K – 8 grade.

Free technology for teachers: the best of 2022 so far

Excluding the webinar I’m hosting today, I’m taking the rest of the week off. As I leave I will republish some of the most popular posts of the year so far.

PHET is a great resource that I have shared a bunch over the years. Recently, I was looking at the site when I noticed that its activity search tool now includes a filter for remote activity. With this search tool you can identify remote instructions and lesson plans designed for learning. You can combine the remote search filter with any other topic, level, and language search filter. Watch this short video to see how it works.

More about PhET

In the following video I have shown you how to incorporate PhET science and math simulations on your Google site. Those of you who watch the video will also notice that the simulations can also be shared directly through Google Classroom integration.

Dozens of PhET simulations are available to insert into PowerPoint presentations using PhET’s free PowerPoint add-in. By installing the add-in you can browse the available simulations and insert them into your slides. The simulations work on your slides just like they work on the PhET website.

Help! My rich team teacher is wasting his students with gifts

Dear WeAreTeachers:
My fellow teachers don’t have to work. Teaching is his legitimate hobby. He spends most of the money he earns in his class, if not all. He buys outstanding gifts for all his students and even orders almost weekly dordash / pizza. Now I’m not saying he’s not a great teacher. He usually likes his job, but being his teammate is tiring. I am a single parent who needs to teach and work in the attendance program so that I can finish. And yet her class has a pizza party every Friday. I can say it annoys my students that they don’t get matching shirts, special lunches and expensive gifts to wear. I think I’m not good enough at times. – Love can’t buy me

Dear CBML,
It is very common for us to fall into the trap of comparison in our personal and professional contexts. You are working hard for your family and seeing day by day for your students. Your value is not based on what your teammates do or don’t do. And your teammate’s materialistic approach sounds pretty extreme. Behavior has meaning and perhaps this teacher feels somewhat insecure with the core, complex aspects of teaching. This teacher may like kids, but shower students with gifts Accessories What a great teacher it is. Do you hear students repeatedly say, “What do I get?”

Take a few moments to think about your favorite teachers throughout all seasons of your life. What made them effective and memorable for you? I would like to say that your favorite teachers have probably given birth to your curiosity and amazement, encouraging you to engage in self-reflection and build meaningful, empathetic relationships, value multiple perspectives, boost your confidence socially and academically and communicate more effectively. Yes, you can remember a pizza party here and there, but I’m sure lasting memories are more about how you felt and what you learned.

So what’s the problem with focusing on external rewards and materialism? This may sound innocent, but as Adela Hunting writes, “Unfortunately, external motivation can also lead to loss of enjoyment in activities that were previously pleasurable internally. Teachers who focus on gifts, rewards, and prizes can have unintended consequences of overcoming the more subtle joy of learning and progress.

We’ve all seen temporary spikes of emotion while showering with gifts. The point is, it has no lasting effect. “It should come as no surprise to anyone who tracks the science of happiness, which suggests that material things cannot enhance our happiness in a sustainable or meaningful way. Indeed, research suggests that materialistic people are less happy than their peers. They feel less positive emotions. , Less satisfied with life and suffering from higher levels of anxiety, depression and substance abuse. ” So, your students may be fascinated on things, but you as a person influence them more than what you buy.

It’s so easy to focus on what you can control and it’s hard to keep up with the practice. Let’s try to stay in your alley, ready with family, your well-being, strong relationships with your students and your plans and guidance. I argue that the role of teachers as your team partner professional is diminishing, and if you have the strength and courage, try to have a conversation with a trusted leader on your site to share what you are noticing and feeling.

Dear WeAreTeachers:
I had pudding and sprite at my year-end party. And I know it went against the rules, but I think it was okay for the last day. Remember, the admin has previously rewarded appearances with Popsicles. I guess my kids said one or the other, but the administrator found out. When it was time for dismissal, suddenly our interlocutor came to my door telling me that he was taking my kids to the gate. And he shared that my principal and AP are coming to talk to me. I couldn’t say goodbye to my students, hug them or let my parents take pictures with me. Instead, I sat in my classroom and handed over a written warning for policy violations. Do you have any suggestions? -Time is everything

Dear TIE,
Happy summer to you! I hope you find a way to recharge. The end of the school year is always so full of activity and passion. I’m sure you’re not the only teacher to celebrate this exciting time with some sweet treats. The point is, timing matters. You should have walked to your kids’ gate, and I’m sorry you had to feel the warmth, the gratitude, the relief, and the shock of the connection fading. While missing the final farewell was frustrating and amazing, I hope you know that your impact transcends and endures this kind of snuff.

Let your principal know that it was annoying to miss walking outside with your kids for the last day of dismissal. We all know that relationships are the heart of education!

The schools are full of hypocrisy. A good example is the principal who passes out the popsicles and then rules you out for a small treat on the last day. Counseling agency Straight Talk explains that “everyone has a tendency to be hypocritical at some point. It is virtually impossible to survive entirely in our own moral code, because we all make mistakes. We may sincerely believe in objective morality, but we can justify ourselves when it comes to our shortcomings. “

So, yes, we all make mistakes and this sweet treat is a secondary one. And maybe your principal thinks their rewards are worthy and not your year-end party.

It is understandable that schools have become more strict about food over the years. In some places, food is often used as an external stimulus. I knew that every birthday celebration and prize party centered on junk food. My daughters ate pizza, chips and cupcakes at school several times a month. There are many people who have eating restrictions (including my kids), and inevitably some students have dropped out due to health problems. This can feel awful to a student. Although some teachers arrange alternatives, it often seems uncomfortable for children.

I’ve tried to get parents of elementary-school-aged kids to spend money on beautifully read books instead of processed foods but it never got traction. Imagine a birthday celebration where the child presents a favorite book in class and the teacher has a special seat in front while reading. The bookplate inside can be a meaningful offering for the child and the classroom library will also be filled with these personal treasures.

Dear WeAreTeachers:
My principal met with me one by one and shared the news that they thought it was time for me to try a grade-level change. They even said that the sixth grade team would benefit a lot from getting me. The truth is I am very nervous about changing my grade-level from kindergarten to sixth grade. I like to be with the little ones, although it can be so much more modeled and the tasks can be broken down into digestible parts. Sixth-grade math feels awful and I’m worried that the kids won’t relate to me or like me. I’m also insecure that they’re removing me because they think I didn’t do well enough. Should I move to school or try sixth grade once? – Sixth grade scares me

Dear SGSM,
Grade changes can bring a lot of mixed emotions! It’s normal to feel a little shaky at the moment. And believe that what you know and what you do well with young students will also help you in the sixth-grade classroom setting. Attending your teacher, intentional planning, instruction, monitoring progress, and establishing a caring classroom community are important in any of your grades.

So many educators feel a kind of fear about working with older students. Often people think that sixth graders lack motivation or interest in school. This can happen in some situations, and we still have the ability to create an inviting, welcoming, engaging classroom culture. I say try the sixth grade once. Either way, whether you choose a new grade level or a new school, you need to do some extra work.

Try not to take grade-level change as a negative. Principals are often working to create more effective team dynamics based on the strengths of teachers. Yes, sixth grade is often the first year of middle school and it is full of all kinds of changes and challenges. But you can do it! Your grade-level team can help you change and organize for complex ideas, especially math. Be honest with your principal and let them know that you will appreciate some on-the-clock planning and collaboration time with your team.

Your sixth graders will appreciate the choice, the freedom and the responsibility. Consider taking children out for meaningful, relevant, and hands-on learning experiences. Richard Lowe has written several books on the role of nature for children in shaping a meaningful life. Mixing “Vitamin N (Nature)” with your students can really inspire and inspire.

Your older students need support and guidance when they grow up. Dive in and enjoy the deep connections and ideas that you can feel together. The WeAreTeachers community has put together some excellent sixth-grade resources to boost your confidence and excitement about this big change time.

Do you have a burning question? Email us at [email protected]

Dear WeAreTeachers:
I have just finished my first year of teaching and are officially on summer vacation. I noticed that any time my husband is reminded that I won’t be working for the next three months, it really goes under his skin. He didn’t actually say anything rude or pick any fight with me about it but just commented here and there. “It’s getting late আছে well, I don’t think it’s for you anymore.” I think it’s more of a jealous thing, because he doesn’t like his job and his salary is lower than mine. I think it’s hard to accept that I’m getting this “prok” with a higher salary. So how do I remedy this situation?

Want more advice columns? Check out our Ask WeAreTeachers Hub.

Teaching portfolio examples to showcase your talents

Do you have a teaching portfolio? If not here’s a new product just for you! Not only is it a great way to show off all your hard work and accomplishments, it can be a valuable tool when you are looking for a new job. Let’s face it: working in education is now really unpredictable. You just have to be more discriminating with the help you render toward other people. Start with examples of this teaching portfolio.

Top tips for building a learning portfolio

As you begin to consolidate your learning portfolio, keep in mind that the goal is to provide evidence of your learning experience from a wide range of sources. As you collect and organize the material for your portfolio you get a better idea of ​​what you want to include.

Why you should create a learning portfolio:

  • This is a great opportunity to reflect.
  • It records your professional development.
  • It highlights the success of teaching for job interviews.
  • It verifies that you have met the promotion criteria
  • It tells the story of how you have evolved as a teacher over time.

Be honest.

When you are compiling your education portfolio, you do not want to exaggerate your experience or qualifications. You don’t have to look perfect! Your portfolio should be an accurate and fair representation of your teaching career. Tell the world about your successes, but don’t underestimate the disadvantages. Instead, focus on how you learned from the negative experience.

Choose wisely.

Include materials that show many aspects of your learning. Be selective and put some real thought into it. It is much better for the reader to have a strong set of well-chosen materials than a large collection of uncovered and irresistible documents.

Get organized.

Your learning portfolio should have a clear structure that makes it easy for readers to find what they want to review. Include a table of contents and headings to keep everything in order.

Start planning now.

Creating a solid learning portfolio takes time. You may be tempted to keep it off for a while in the future, but you never know when you will need it. It’s best to start now and set aside time to work each week until it’s over. Then, at the end of each quarter, spend some time updating it to keep it current and relevant.

Teaching portfolio examples

1. Primary Teacher Portfolio

The portfolio of primary education is an example

Mary, a kindergarten teacher at @ sharingkindergarten, shared her portfolio on her blog. It includes a section about me, professional CV and certificate information, classroom management overview, its classroom performance information and much more. This portfolio is neatly arranged in a binder with cover pages for each section that lists what is included.

Learn more: Kindergarten Sharing

2. Digital student-teacher portfolio

Student teacher portfolio

Check out this example of a digital portfolio for a student teacher looking for their first job. This example highlights a teaching philosophy, student work, classroom management, reference letters and much more.

Learn more: Cassandra Burke Teaching Portfolio

3. Print student teacher portfolio

In this video, a teacher who had just been hired in her first role shows the portfolio that gave her the job! If you have just finished your student-learning experience, this example is for you. Go to the second minute of the video to get to the portfolio pages.

4. Editable portfolio template

Editable learning portfolio example

Finding a template that you can customize to your liking can save a lot of time. This template is free from Teach Starter! This includes sections on behavior management, parental communication, assessment and tracking, and teacher collaboration. This example has many deeper sections and you can choose which one you want to include

Learn more: Teach starters

5. Google Site Portfolio

Portfolio of digital education is an example

While it is important to have a physical portfolio for interviewing, it is also quite convenient to have a digital portfolio! When applying for a job or emailing at school, you can easily include a link in your online portfolio so that others can learn more about you. If you’re looking for an example of portfolio learning from Google Sites, check it out from Martha Moore of Primary Paradise. He beautifully illustrates how to create a digital portfolio using Google Sites. Google sites are free and you can transfer data from your physical portfolio, so make it a digital option if you already have one!

Learn more: Early Paradise

6. Digital scroll-through portfolio

Digital or online learning portfolio

Another example of an online portfolio, this option has a scrolling page of content. Instead of clicking through various tabs on the site, readers are able to view the entire portfolio by scrolling a page. Adding visuals like student examples, icons and text links can really make your page pop.

Learn more: Gretchen Sibel

7. Colorful portfolio

Color learning portfolio example

Don’t be afraid of color because it can really pop your experience. This example includes color tabs with content fields such as evaluation, evaluation, policy, and lesson examples created.

Learn more: Lucky Frog Learning

8. Alternative Teacher Portfolio

Sarah Chesman Alternative Teacher Portfolio

Looking for a full-time location? Or are you looking to transform from part-time to something more permanent? This education portfolio created by Sarah Chizman might be right for you! It not only highlights alternative teaching work, it also highlights other related professional experiences.

Learn more: Sarah Chizman

9. PDF portfolio

Holly teaching portfolio example

This portfolio is extremely extensive! Take a look and you can get some ideas that you want to include in your own portfolio. This example sets itself apart because it includes student teaching information as well as student letters.

Learn more: Holly’s portfolio

10. World Language Teacher Portfolio

World Language Teacher Portfolio

If you teach a world language or a special class, this example may be more helpful for you. These Spanish teachers have included student comments and information on engaging class activities.

Learn more: Tyson’s portfolio

11. Portfolio updates

In this YouTube video, a third-year teacher reviews what she has included in her portfolio while looking for her first job. Throughout the video, get tips on revisiting and updating your learning portfolio.

Learn more: Primary Mrs. Katie

12. Experienced teacher portfolio

In this video, a teacher with several years of experience shows her detailed portfolio. A great feature of this portfolio is the use of a QR code to link to a digital website or portfolio!

Do you have more great teaching portfolio examples? Share the comment below.

Also, check out teacher job fair tips and the most common teacher interview questions.

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The best of 2022 so far – QRToon

Excluding the webinar I’m hosting tomorrow, I’m taking the rest of the week off. As I leave I will republish some of the most popular posts of the year so far.

QR codes are easy to make long URLs easily accessible on mobile devices Last year I used QR codes to make it easier for students to access my classroom sign-in / sign-out forms on their phones. I usually use QRCode Monkey or a QR code generator built into Chrome. Recently, I discovered another neat QR code generator called QRToon.

Like all QR code generators, QRToon will generate a QR code for any URL you specify. The difference between QRToon and other QR code builders that you have tried is that QRToon allows you to upload an image to use your QR code. That picture then turned into a cartoon version. The QR code in this post contains a cartoon version of a headset of my own that I uploaded to QRToon.

QRToon is easy to use and does not require registration. Just go to the site, enter the URL you want to convert into a QR code, and then upload an image. QRToon will create QR code with your cartoonized portrait in it. You can download your QR code as a PNG file, print it and use it wherever you like.

It is worth noting that QRToon will only work with images that have only one human face It didn’t work when I tried to use it with pictures of me and my kids. It didn’t work when I tried to use pictures of my dog ​​and cat.

Application for education
Need another QR code generator in the world? Probably not. Is it nice to have a personalized QR code that includes your similarities? Sure. QRToon’s utility is likely to be able to personalize your QR codes to include your similarities for your students to recognize.

However, the QR code of this post will guide you to my ebook, 50 Tech Tuesday Tips.

Summer reading, notebooks and thoughts

If you join or accept one of my webinars about search strategy Teaching history with the help of technology Of course, you probably know that I support two very non-technical activities. These things are reading physical books and writing in a physical notebook.

I’ve always seen that when I read physical books, at least three things happen, whether they’re fiction or nonfiction. I get new ideas in my head. I have the idea that I want to remember. I have to stop and write down my ideas. All of these things are the same and they contribute to making me a somewhat slower reader if the only measure of your reading speed is how many pages you have turned in a given period of time.

A physical notebook is almost always within my reach throughout the day. I start my day by writing in a notebook (day goals, to-do list, reminders). During the day when I want to puzzle through an idea I write in my notebook. And when I’m stuck and can’t think of anything to blog or video, I turn the pages of my notebooks (my notebooks in my office are at least ten years behind).

This summer I am reading The Last King of America and re-reading Twenty Things to Do with a computer. Both books are quickly filling up with notes. Both gave me ideas that I couldn’t find by scrolling through social media accounts or searching Google. I wouldn’t have those notes and ideas through Google search because I didn’t know what I didn’t know until I read the books. Those notes then prompt and form my next Google searches In other words, the books give me more ideas starting from the rabbit hole of investigation.

Is there a point in this post? Yes, this is to remind you to pick a good book and take notes this summer. And in the fall, do the same for your students.

What do I do when a website steals my work

I have been writing on this blog for fifteen years now. For most of that year, I’ve been fighting with people over copyright. Some people think so because it says “free technology for teachers” that they can take what they like and republish wherever they want. Other people have misunderstood what it means to be fair. And some people just don’t care about copyright at all. This is often the case with Super Scooty and Slim websites that use automated scripts to retrieve and republish all my blog posts.

Unfortunately, over the last fifteen years I’ve become quite adept at figuring out where websites that have stolen my work are hosted and how to file copyright infringement notices with those web hosting providers. I spent a lot of time doing this last week (it puts me in a bad mood) so I decided to try to do something effective with my time and recorded this video about how to file a DMCA takedown request with a web host. In this case the web host was Name Cheap. The process is basically the same regardless of the web hosting provider.

Hopefully, you never have to go through boredom and frustration to deal with people who steal your work. But if you do, I hope my video will be helpful for you.

ps I can’t wait to see this blog post stolen by one of the Spammy, Slimmy, Scoozy websites mentioned above like Daily Dodge, Trident of CNC, World New 5, and Star Kids Learn.